Welcome to our online Curriculum and Registration Guide!

Make sure to read the 2020-21 Letter from the Dean of Academic Affairs and then please use the resources below to better understand the offerings and requirements of our academic program.

Course Requirements

Subject AreaRequirement
English Four years
Foreign Language Two consecutive years of the same language
History Two years, including Foundations of Modern Society and US History
Science Two years, including one year of life science and one year of physical science
Mathematics Three years, including Geometry and Algebra II
Fine Arts Two semesters
Human Development One quarter; required only for 10th graders (students who enroll after 10th grade are exempt)
Theology & Religious Studies One semester
Senior Thesis Full year (full credit)

Students are required to take five full-credit courses during any year or term. This requirement applies to all students in all years, even when students have repeated a year of high school. A course in the Fine Arts counts as a full-credit course, with the exception of A Capella or Band, which may be taken as a sixth course. Human Development is also taken as a sixth course. Students who feel that the five-course load is too burdensome during any particular term must submit their request to the Academic Committee to carry a four-course load for that term. Requests will be considered only for students in extreme circumstances.

Interested in Advanced Placement classes?
Please see our AP Requirements here.

Students considering application to selective colleges should plan to take:
  • Three or more years of the same foreign language
  • Four years of math
  • Three or four years of science, including Chemistry and Physics

Course Offerings/Descriptions

Click on each department/course name to expand the description.
  • ENGLISH

    • English 9: Humanities

    • English 10: Global Literatures

      1. This course presents literary study through global social and cultural contexts.
      2. Students think deeply and write frequently about questions concerning their own identities in relation to social identifiers such as race, gender, ethnicity, nationality, sexual identity, religious belief, class, and privilege.
      3. Writing and other assignments link literary study with artistic expression, connecting the course with their March Artward Bound Experience.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      If you are in Ms. Dahl's or Mr. Paro's class, please order:

      If you are in Mr. Gaudet's class, please order:

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • AP Language & Composition

      The course aims to further student understanding and appreciation of the English language, particularly language used to argue and persuade. The class will study the logic of English usage, learn new words, and read writing that exemplifies precision and rhetorical force. In the first semester, content and assignments in the course will center on understanding and clarifying personal values, and weighing these against accepted societal values. The second semester will explore specific means of persuasion employed in American society. Articulate, deliberate, precise language will be encouraged and reinforced in writing assignments, oral reports, and class discussions.

      Our curriculum is designed with two factors in mind. First, it is intended to further the language development fostered in earlier grades of our school’s English curriculum and prepare students (those juniors enrolled in the class) for their final year of secondary school. Second, it capitalizes on the specific goals of the Advanced Placement curriculum. The demands of the AP program divergent from our school’s traditional curriculum—among them the focus of specific rhetorical techniques and language and the development of image analysis skills—require our enrolled students to be especially dedicated and diligent.

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    • AP Literature

      AP Literature and Composition focuses on the study of language used for artistic purposes. Students develop their analytical skills by reading poetry, novels, short stories, and plays. In addition to teaching students to appreciate the skillful use of rich, complex, evocative language, the class aims at developing students’ writing skills. Most of the writing in AP literature is analytic in nature, although some time is devoted to the college essay in September. The course is open to 12th graders and culminates in the taking of the Advanced Placement examination in May.

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    • Advanced English Seminar: 6 Short Novels

      Though some of the world’s great literature comes in large packages - Anna Karenina, Moby Dick, Emma, Grapes of Wrath - some really exceptional stories are told in a much more compact form. In this class, we will read six short novels and examine the elements of fiction that make for a good read. Here are the possibilities:
      • The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald (218 pages)
      • July’s People Nadine Gordimer (195 pages)
      • Things Fall Apart Chinua Achebe (212 pages)
      • Fahrenheit 451 Ray Bradbury (256 pages)
      • Sula Toni Morrison (192 pages)
      • Time’s Arrow Martin Amis (173 pages)
      • Child of God Cormac McCarthy (209 pages)
      • Wide Sargasso Sea Jean Rhys (160 pages)
      • The Old Man and the Sea Ernest Hemingway (112 pages)

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      Coming soon.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Creative Non-Fiction

      In this class students will practice many forms of creative nonfiction from personal narratives to fact based persuasive essays. Each class starts with a writing exercise designed to tap creativity, prompt further writing, and create a culture of free expression. Students will learn literary techniques and develop their own writing process. In addition to writing, students will also read creative non-fiction about the writing process.

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    • Advanced English Seminar: Heroes & Heroines: The Monomyth in American Literary Canon

      In 1949, Joseph Camphell famously posited that there was an archetypal storyline that can be used to describe a genre of writing that described the “Hero’s Journey.”  His work will be used to consider both male heroes and female heroines to discover what it contributes to our understanding of what it means to be heroic... and human. Ultimately, students will write their own narrative in a tradition inspired by Campbell’s work.
       
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      Texts for the course include Star Wars: A New Hope (Episode IV), "Sonny's Blues,"  and:

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Literature of the American Landscape

      From urban sprawl to climate change to controversies over energy extraction, environmental issues permeate our discussions about the present and future state of the world. This course seeks to contextualize such conversations by introducing students to the deep history of American environmental literature. We will be particularly concerned with examining how people in different times and places, fictional and not, have understood what constitutes nature, what constitutes wilderness, and how these understandings shape our interactions with the non-human world. In doing so, we will also think about our own local surroundings at Holderness, interrogating everything from the White Mountains to the Pemigewasset to Out Back. Readings will likely include works by Edward Abbey, Leslie Marmon Silko, Richard Powers, Terry Tempest Williams, Walker Percy, and Claire Vaye Watkins, as well as many of the canonical environmental writers (Carson, Thoreau, Muir, Leopold, etc.).
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      Coming soon.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Literature of Survival

      How does an individual survive in the wilderness? How might a neglected child survive to become a well-adjusted adult? What do you do when you are left alone...in outer-space? In this class, students will explore the attributes necessary for one to survive difficult situations. Through reading a varied array of fictional tales and non-fictional stories and articles, students will uncover the characteristics of a survivor.

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    • Advanced English Seminar: Sports in Literature

      Alongside academics and residential life, athletics forms one of the core components of the boarding school triad. During students’ time at Holderness, they will inevitably spend hundreds of hours out on the fields, the ice, the courts, the trails, and the slopes, competing against themselves and others. This course takes that work into the classroom, examining the rich literature of sports in order to help students develop a more comprehensive understanding of the role that athletics play in their lives. Using short stories, essays, poems, novels, and book-length works of non-fiction, we will look at how sports can shed light on larger life questions, how different authors use language to grapple with this challenge, and how we as a society decide which sports stories are told and which are not. Readings will likely include works by Don DeLillo, Quan Barry, Ken Dryden, Toni Cade Bambara, John Updike, Alan Sillitoe, and Kate Fagan, among others.

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    • Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature

      Do you have a Bible on your shelf somewhere but you’ve never really read it? Did you know the Bible is more of a library than a book? Are the readings in chapel a total mystery to you? Have you ever encountered a biblical reference in another book and wished you knew more? Are you or a loved one named after a figure in the Bible but know little about the namesake? Do you ever wonder how and why the Bible animates historical and contemporary political speech and action? Do you ever wonder what are some of the biblical sources that undergird Western theories of law and justice? Do you appreciate great writing? Do you wish someday to be able to call yourself well-read?
       
      The Bible as Literature is an upper-level semester course which provides an additional choice for students seeking to satisfy the graduation requirement in Theology & Religious Studies.  Cross-listed with the English dept, the course is listed as ENG on the transcript.

      METHOD:
      The course provides an introduction to the Judeo-Christian canon of biblical texts as works of sacred literature and rhetoric.  Students will explore the range of biblical genres through a survey of its historical, prophetic, poetic, sophistic, liturgical, gospel, and apocalyptic literatures.  With analysis of character, plot, form, literary devices, and redaction, they will learn to decipher and defend their own interpretive and rhetorical choices as biblical readers.

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    • Advanced English Seminar: Travel Writing in an Age of Isolation

      With recent threats of a pandemic, polarizing politics, environmental degradation, and increased isolationism, one might wonder if the era of unlimited, largely unfettered travel for pleasure has been forever changed. Is travel as we know it obsolete? Or does this era of new nationalism (with its suspicion of foreignness) forecast a kind of proud provincialism in which people feel safe and content sheltering at home? Will travel literature assume heightened status as the main gateway to experiencing “otherness”? In this course, students will ponder these questions and others, while exploring the art and craft of travel writing -- the long tradition of documenting and reflecting on encounters with the unfamiliar. They will both read exemplars of the best in travel writing and write their own narratives of place. 
       
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      Coming soon. Readings are likely to include works by Bruce Chatwin, Anthony Doerr, Mark Twain, Isabella Bird, Frances Mayes, and Elizabeth Gilbert, among others.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Widening the River: American Voices Beyond the Mainstream

      A continuation and extension of Asian American Literature offered last fall, this course seeks to broaden the scope of the American Literary landscape, pulling in voices that have not always been read or heard. We will explore new classics in Asian-American, Pacific-Islander and Native-American literature with a focus on the storytelling traditions of those cultures, guided by the question, "What is the language and narrative structure of a 'hyphenated' American experience?" Readings are likely to include works by Maxine Hong Kingston Amy Tan, Louise Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, Garrett Hongo, Thi Bui, and Robin Wall Kimmerer, among others.

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      Also on the reading list:
      • Assorted essays by Chang Rae Lee (accessible through school subscription of The New Yorker); Robin Wall Kimmerer (from Braiding Sweetgrass), N. Scott Momaday, Amy Tan, and others
      • Poems by: Ocean Vuong, Li-Young Lee, Garrett Hongo, and others (to be provided by teacher)
      • Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich or There There by Tommy Orange (tbd; please hold off on ordering)
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
  • HISTORY

    • Foundations of Modern Society

      All ninth grade students are required to take Foundations of Modern Society, a one–semester course in the second semester. Emphasizing fundamental historical thinking skills through diverse case studies, this course serves as a unifying academic experience for the students and is a foundation for their future studies in history. It is intentionally broad in scope and teachers employ 3-4 diverse content areas to grapple with the essential question: How do social groups form and thrive? While the specific units vary from year to year and teacher to teacher, there is a special focus on the role governments play in forming societies, the way perception of the “other” can form a group, and the way an idea can develop a group identity. There is an explicit focus on developing in each student an understanding that every source, primary or secondary, is an interpretation. To that end, teachers employ in each unit at least of two different historians’ interpretations of a historical event, several contrasting primary sources, and various visual interpretations in each unit. This course also shares a main essential question with the English I course, “How do I learn best?” and focuses on developing students’ metacognition about their individual learning processes.

      Potential and past unit topics (at individual teacher’s discretion):
      • Collective Learning and Early Human Evolution
      • Agricultural Revolution
      • The Development of Ancient States: Rome, China, Political Philosophy
      • The Holocaust and Comparative Genocide Studies
      • New Colonialism and the Belgian Congo
      • Apartheid South Africa
      • Jim Crow America
      • Communist Revolutions
      • The Industrial Revolution

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 1

      This semester-length required US History course will be the starting point for all future historical inquiry at Holderness. The course will focus on the development of the Constitution and the Reconstruction eras. These foundational topics will introduce themes of a variety of civil liberties, but notably freedom of speech and suffrage. The essential question will be: What does it mean to be a US citizen?

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    • US History 2: 20th Century America through Film

      In this semester long elective, students will examine and study key events and topics of the twentieth century in America utilizing films as both primary and secondary sources. In a growing digital age, where video and films have become increasingly prevalent, students need to be critical viewers and recognize the possibility for bias and see the importance of perspective and point of view. Over the course of the semester we will look at four or five main events and time periods. Each unit will consist of three main parts. First we will spend time reading, discussing, and learning about the historical context of the given unit. This will be done through the readings of largely primary source documents, but also some secondary sources. Second we will watch a major motion picture that addresses some aspect of the topic (instead of purchasing books for this class, they will be required to purchase a digital copy of the films). Lastly, students will either write an essay or conduct in-depth debate style discussions both confirming and complicating the film as either a primary and/or secondary source. One of the main questions to be answered will be, how does [said film] contribute to our study and understanding of [said topic]?

      List of Potential Films Used: The Birth of A Nation (1915), Cinderella Man (2005), Mississippi Burning (1988), The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), Dr. Strangelove (1964), Platoon (1986) Or Apocalypse Now (1979)

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 2: A Bigger Government: The Great Depression and the New Deal

      Every facet of American society was rapidly changing at the turn of the 20th century and the modern American Identity was beginning to take shape. This semester elective will focus on the time period of 1900- 1945, primarily focusing on the how America got itself into the Great Depression and then how the Second World War, pulled America out of the Great Depression. We will look not only at the economic impacts of Depression but also the social and political impacts. Through primary and secondary source analysis, students will be forced to confirm and complicate the documents to further develop their own understandings of the time period. Lastly, we will also make connections to the 2008 Recession, the largest economic recession, since the Great Depression.

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 2: Case Studies in American Democracy

      This course was developed along with the Case Method Project at Harvard Business School. The foundational belief of the class, and the Case Method Project, is that the enduring challenges of self-government are complex and each individual must be prepared to make sense of them. The course will center around a diverse set of highly focused case studies from key moments in American history, including:
      • Meat Packing in the Progressive Era
      • Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Fight for Black Voting Rights
      • Leadership at the Federal Reserve in Relation to the 2008 Financial Crisis
      • Citizens United (2010) and Corporate Speech
      These cases will force students to confront questions that have been at the heart of America since its inception, including:
      • What is the proper balance between majority rule and the protection of individual rights?
      • Who is included in ‘We the People’?
      • What is (and should be) the role of informal institutions, such as the press, in democratic decision-making?
      • How should lawmakers conceive of the relationship between democracy and the market?
      By working within various historical contexts during case-based discussions, students hone their ability to think about key issues confronting our country today, in addition to gaining a deep understanding the nation’s history. By showing how these profound questions relate to tangible, concrete problems and outcomes, the cases also encourage students to take interest in them even outside of class. The course not only trains students to competently confront difficult questions facing citizens—it inspires them to seek these questions out in the first place.

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 2: Constitutional Law

      The US Constitution was first printed on four large sheets of parchment in the fall of 1787. It was written, signed and ratified by men who had never seen a train, a planet beyond Saturn, or an independent country in the Western Hemisphere, but it continues to impact each of our lives every day. Through a study of US Supreme Court decisions, this course will trace interpretations of the Constitution as they evolved over the past 230 years. We will focus on three primary areas of law: civil rights, the rights of the accused, and the protections granted by the First Amendment. By focusing on a few recent justices, we will also introduce legal reasoning and competing judicial philosophies. Come for Brown v. Board, stay for Brandenburg v. Ohio.

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      Coming soon.
    • AP US/AP European History: Advanced History of the West 1 & 2

      Application required
      This two year course, beginning in the 10th or 11th grade year, will prepare students for both the Advanced Placement European History Exam and the Advanced Placement US History Exam. Students must submit an application and will be vetted for admission. This course will employ a broader lens to explore historical phenomena on both sides of the Atlantic embracing the globalized approach of modern historical research. Study of the American constitution, for example, will be endowed with prior study of the Enlightenment. Students will be expected to engage in a project in the summer between the two years of the course. Students will take both exams, but may petition to take only one at the end of their second year of the course (in their junior or senior year). This course will be team taught (either two teachers ½ time, or two teachers full time) for the first iteration of the course.


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       (Year 1 texts)
      (Year 2 text)
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    • AP Comparative Government & Politics

      This year-long course prepares students for the AP Comparative Government exam. The AP Curriculum mandates study of six core core countries. In this elective students will consider the United Kingdom, Mexico, Nigeria (three of the core countries) and India, a notable exception from the curriculum.

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    • AP European History

      Open to qualified 11th graders and 12th graders, the AP European History elective introduces students to the cultural, intellectual, economic, social, political, and diplomatic developments of European history from 1450 to the present day. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements that shaped Europe, the goals of the AP program in European history are to develop an understanding of the principal themes in modern European history, an ability to analyze historical evidence, and an ability to express historical understanding in writing.

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    • Ancient Greece

      In this survey course (with a thematic approach), students will learn the history of ancient Greece. Topics covered in this course include Greek warfare, the Trojan War, Greek mythology, the origins of democracy, the Golden Age of Athens, Sparta, The Persian Wars, The Peloponnesian War, and Alexander the Great. Students will learn how the ancient Greeks influenced modern society and how they left behind a rich cultural and political legacy that still affects us today.

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    • Enlightenment and Romanticism

      Offered on a bi-annual bases. LIKELY NOT TO BE OFFERED IN 2021-22, interested rising juniors are advised to take in 2020-21.
      This semester elective is designed for students who develop an interest in intellectual history and want the opportunity to seek further depth. By reading and studying the poetry, art, and prose literature of these two movements, we hope to understand the dynamic interaction between the rationalism and optimism of 1750-1800 and the haunted, wild Romantic ideas of 1800-1850. We will also trace the legacy of these movements in the Western tradition. Students will spend most of their time evaluating and commenting on selected primary sources from Locke to Poe.


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    • Intro to Philosophy

      What do I know? Why do I exist? Where does evil come from? These are just some of the questions this course attempts to answer. Introduction to philosophy aims to teach students how philosophy emerged in ancient times, from the presocratics like Thales of Miletus, to more established and recognized ancient philosophers like Socrates and Aristotle, and how they influenced later thinkers like Hypatia and Seneca. Besides covering famous philosophers, this course attempts to introduce students to life’s most riveting questions using both ancient and modern philosophy, and philosophy in today’s popular media like Star Wars.

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      No textbook required.
    • Political Media

      In this semester-long junior or senior elective students will consider the role of mass communications in politics. Each unit will consider a different aspect of the media including traditional print journalism, political cartoons, photography, radio, comedic television, and the expanding landscape of social media. Study of a particular medium will begin with case studies on how the communications technology was developed and used in various historical periods. Students will hone their analytical skills in each unit by composing an analysis of a modern example of the medium in question. With a growing public criticism of the role of the media in politics and the questions surrounding “Fake News,” this course will also focus on developing educated and inquisitive consumers of media. As a projects-based class, each unit will be assessed with students trying their hand the media form in question to comment on the a current events topic. Students should expect to engage in collaborative work, group discussions, short analytical compositions and practice real-world application of the theories, ideas and examples studied as they generate their own media.

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      No textbook required.
    • Post War American Intellectual History

      This course is designed to give students access to the great historically-inclined intellectual works of post-World War II America and will complement fall enrollment in Enlightenment and Romanticism. In particular, these works demonstrate modern intellectual reactions against mass movements. Through an international lens, the works would especially look at concerns surrounding the rise of both communism and fascism leading up to, including, and following the Second World War. Additionally, the works will take many of these global apprehensions and apply them to growth of massive organizations and materialism in America itself. This reaction gave birth to American movement that prized individuality over the group. Authors: Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism, Reinhold Niebuhr, The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness, Eric Hoffer, William Whyte, John Updike, David Brooks.

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    • Psychology 1

      Psychology I concentrates on the study of the human mind and human behavior. It is broken down into four units:
      1. The History of Psychology
      2. Biological Psychology
      3. Developmental Psychology
      4. Social Psychology
      The course is designed to give students a foundation of psychology and lead to an interest in further study of psychology. Regardless of how far students go with their study of psychology, students will have a better understanding of the human mind and reasoning behind human behavior after this introductory course.

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      No textbook required.
    • Psychology 2

      A semester-length opportunity for continued study in Psychology. The prerequisite is Psychology I, but these two courses do not have to be taken in the same calendar year (could be taken 11th and 12th grade for example). Psychology II includes topics such as learning and memory, motivation and emotion, intelligence testing and individual differences, and abnormal psychology. The course is an opportunity to dive deeper into the different types of psychology discussed in Psychology I, such as biological, developmental, cognitive, and social psychology.

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      No textbook required.
    • The Modern Middle East

      Offered on a bi-annual basis. LIKELY NOT TO BE OFFERED IN 2021-22; interested rising juniors are advised to take in 2020-21.
      Open to 11th and 12th graders, this semester-long elective explores the complexity of one of the most paradoxical regions in the world. The Middle East encompasses some of the richest and poorest countries. It is the geographic foundation of the three largest world religions and is perhaps one of the most turbulent regions of the twenty-first century. This course examines the sources of today’s socio-political problems, including twentieth century imperialism, the Balfour Declaration, the Cold War, and globalization. This course seeks to determine what needs to change in order to create a viable peace in the Middle East.


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      No textbook required.
    • Women and Warfare

      The history of warfare is a history that is seldom offered in schools. Yet, the history of war is the history of civilizations, which is why this topic is essential for the study and understanding of human civilization. Using as case studies individual women who were prominent in wartime, students will learn how warfare endured, evolved, and how it transformed the way humans interacted with each other in complex societies.

      Covering topics ranging from the ancient battles between Greek and Persian civilizations, to modern wars like World War II and recent 21st century military conflicts, this course will teach students the complexities of war throughout history using prominent women who were involved in conflict in diverse ways. Students, for example, will learn about the beginning and end of the Roman Empire through Cleopatra and the early Christian martyr Perpetua, about the One Hundred Years’ War through Joan of Arc, and about European Imperialism through the warrior women of the Kingdom of Dahomey in West Africa, among others. We will address the fundamental question of what happens to the history of warfare when it is looked at through women’s eyes.


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      No textbook required.
  • SCIENCE

    • Biology

      This course introduces students to essential principles of biology: cells, chemistry of life, genetics, evolutionary theory, biological diversity, and organism structure and function. Human anatomy and physiology are emphasized. Students use the framework of the scientific method to explore the living world in laboratory investigations. They are challenged to learn highly detailed material in order to gain greater appreciation for the diversity of life on earth, to understand prevailing thinking on the origin and evolution of living things, and to develop a clear sense of how Homo sapiens fit into this intricate web.

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    • AP Biology

      The AP Biology course covers the entire Advanced Placement curriculum, fully preparing students for the AP exam. There is a comprehensive laboratory component to the course, which includes applications of recombinant DNA technologies and experience using modern lab techniques and equipment. The AP Biology course assists students in organizing biological concepts and topics into a coherent conceptual framework, helps students internalize and effectively utilize the processes of scientific reasoning, and helps them develop or enhance their interest in biology and gain a sense of the subject’s relevance to their everyday lives. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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    • Chemistry

      Though this is a demanding college preparatory course, the teachers encourage an appreciation of the role chemistry plays in our daily lives outside of the classroom. Simply stated, chemistry is the study of matter and the changes it undergoes. This course is designed to challenge students’ problem-solving skills while covering the concepts of a traditional introductory college preparatory course. Students are given the opportunity to explore the world around them through lab work, class discussions, and activities including an in-depth look at the chemistry of the food we eat and a study of the gases in our atmosphere.

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      No textbook required.
    • Honors Chemistry

      This course is designed to explore the fundamental nature of matter and study its physical and chemical characteristics. Students engage in laboratory activities that reinforce the scientific method, apply knowledge to real-world applications, and integrate technology in the science classroom. The honors course differs from regular chemistry in its more strenuous mathematical component, complexity, and depth of theory studied.

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    • Physics

      Physics examines four basic areas of study: mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermal energy, and modern physics. The objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to identify four unifying themes of science: scale, models (physical, mathematical, or conceptual), constancy and change, and systems.

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    • Honors Physics

      The Honors Physics course is a rigorous, math-intensive introduction to the subject. The bulk of the course is devoted to the study of mechanics, or the behavior of particles subject to systems of forces, and includes topics such as one- and two-dimensional kinematics, Newton’s Laws, momentum, mechanical energy, rotational motion, gravitation, and oscillations. During the final quarter of the year students examine a variety of modern topics, particularly electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes collaborative work and problem-solving techniques and involves frequent lab work. The course is designed to develop a solid foundation for college-level physics and to instill an appreciation for and curiosity about the complexity of the universe.

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      No textbook required.
    • AP Physics C: Mechanics

      AP Physics C is a demanding college-level course that requires the use of calculus. The course emphasizes collaborative work and problem-solving techniques. The course aims at covering Mechanics (one of the two Physics C AP examinations). Instruction includes video lectures and computer applets. In class, students will engage in problem sets and labs. Labs – both virtual and real – will be done on a weekly basis. This course is designed to replace introductory college physics courses designed for physics and engineering majors.

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      No textbook required.
    • AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

      AP Physics C-E&M is a second-year AP physics class that is intended to replace a college-level introductory course in electricity and magnetism. The course makes extensive use of calculus techniques in the exploration of topics such as electric fields, electric potential, capacitance, circuits, magnetic fields, and electromagnetic induction. Students are required to work well both independently and in small groups, and labs involve long-term, independent projects. Due to the sophisticated conceptual material and mathematical techniques involved, it is strongly recommended that students complete AP calculus and AP physics C-M before taking the course.

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      No textbook required.
    • Environmental Science

      Students enrolled in the Environmental Science course are assumed to possess a broad background in biology and chemistry. Students are provided with experience in advanced field work, laboratory techniques, and laboratory investigation reporting techniques through activities focusing on local ecosystems. Students pursue, from both scientific and social scientific perspectives, the effect of human societies on the natural world. The course stresses students' responsibility for determining the quality of the environment and, consequently, their own lives. Sustainability principles are given special emphasis. Students are trained to identify and seek solutions to environmental problems. In addition to local environmental issues, students investigate the global trends of overpopulation, ecosystem degradation, atmospheric change, and loss of biodiversity.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • AP Environmental Science

      The goal of the Advanced Placement Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems, both natural and humanmade, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study (e.g. biology, chemistry, earth science, geography), yet there are several major unifying themes that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The course takes advantage of the environs surrounding our campus for firsthand research. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Exercise Physiology

      In this course, students will study acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. Muscle, environmental physiology, practical physiology testing, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular function in response to exercise training will be emphasized in the classroom and applied to laboratory activities.

      Objectives: Students who successfully complete the requirements for this course will:
      • Have a foundational understanding of the complex nature of the human organism from a physiological perspective.
      • Understand the muscular and energy physiological demands from an inactive state to an active state.
      • Understand the acute physiological responses to exercise.
      • Understand the chronic physiological adaptations to exercise.
      • Have mastered basic physiological laboratory experiments and procedures.
      This is a complementary course to the Topics in Human Anatomy and Physiology course.

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      Textbooks will be assigned in class.
    • Neuroscience

      This course will focus on the nervous, endocrine, immune, excretory and digestive systems. Questions such as: Why is laughter infectious? What role does emotion play in memory? How does alcoholism affect balance? How does cancer immunotherapy work? Why does diabetes affect the kidneys? And just how important is vitamin D? will be addressed through discussions, readings, lectures, videos and activities. Laboratory investigations will include a fetal pig dissection and physiology labs. This is offered as a semester course to juniors and seniors. This is a complementary course to the Anatomy and Physiology course focusing on exercise physiology.

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    • Nutrition

      This is an introductory course in nutrition. The focus of the course will be placed on evidence based nutritional strategies to meet the nutrient and energy demands of basic life functions, physical activity, exercise and athletic performance. Scientific literature will be used to evaluate nutritional information found in the media, claims for dietary supplements and popular diets.

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      Coming soon.
    • STEM Robotics I

      As an introductory course in robotics the students will learn JAVA computer programming as well as problem solving strategies. This course will involve students in the development, building and programming of a Tetrix robot. Working in teams they design, build, program and document their progress. Topics include motor control, gear ratios, torque, friction, sensors, timing, program loops, logic gates, decision-making, timing sequences, propulsion systems and binary number systems. Student designed robots will be programmed to compete in a variety of autonomous and remote controlled challenges.

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      No textbook required.
    • STEM Robotics II

      The STEM Robotics II course builds upon the skills students learned in STEM Robotics I. Working in teams, students will design, build, and program Tetrix robots which must complete more complex and more precise tasks with less margin for error than the projects in STEM Robotics I.

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      No textbook required.
  • MATHEMATICS

    • Algebra 1

      This is a cornerstone course designed to prepare students to investigate and master more complex, but related, concepts studied over the balance of the mathematics curriculum. Students review the language of algebra, real number operations, and approaches used to solve linear equations before engaging in an expanded study of function graphing, linear analysis, methods of solving linear inequalities, and systems of both inequalities and linear equations. Multiplication of polynomials, factoring, and solving quadratic and exponential functions, together with simplification and evaluation of radical expressions, constitute the remainder of the course.

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      Please have a TI-84 Plus calculator. No textbook required.
    • Geometry

      This course covers the fundamental concepts of geometry, with algebra and discrete mathematical topics woven into the curriculum. Topics include reasoning and proof, building blocks of geometric shapes, congruence and similarity, right triangles and trigonometry, transformations of figures and equations, and surface area and volume.

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      Please have a TI-84 Plus calculator. No textbook required.
    • Algebra 2

      In this course, students continue the study of concepts introduced in Algebra I and Geometry. Concepts such as linear functions, linear regression, data analysis, matrices, and systems of equations are introduced as important tools to explore, analyze, and make conjectures as we further develop mathematical problem-solving skills. Using real-world examples, students explore quadratic equations, polynomials, and operations of functions. Students also examine properties, applications, and graphs of absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, power, radical, and trigonometric functions.

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      If you purchased a used book at the end of the year, please bring it to school with you. If you have not purchased a book yet, you do not need to purchase one. We will use them sporadically throughout the year for homework/reference and we will lend one out to you if you do not already have onePlease also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
    • Honors Algebra 2

      In this honors course, students continue the study of concepts introduced in Algebra I and Geometry. Concepts such as linear functions, linear regression, data analysis, matrices, and systems of equations are introduced as important tools to explore, analyze, and make conjectures as we further develop mathematical problem-solving skills. Using real-world examples, students explore quadratic equations, polynomials, and operations of functions. Students also examine properties, applications, and graphs of absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, power, radical, and trigonometric functions.

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       Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Precalculus

      This course offers a more rigorous approach to the study of functions and to the topics needed for calculus. The emphasis of this course is on analysis through formal mathematical notation and the relation of mathematical concepts to real world scenarios. Major topics include linear, exponential, and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions; polynomials; radical functions; mathematical limits; composition of functions; and inverses of functions.

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       Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      If you only want an electronic copy, you may access the free text here: opentextbookstore.com/precalc/
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Honors Precalculus

      This course is designed for students who have completed Honors Algebra 2. Honors Precalculus covers all of the topics studied in the regular pre-calculus course; however, the pace is slightly faster than regular pre-calculus so that the students will be able to cover more trigonometry and topics that will prepare them for AP Calculus. By the end of the class the students will not only be introduced to topics that are vital to understanding Calculus, such as continuity and limits, but they will also be introduced to the derivative through the limit definition.

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       Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      If you only want an electronic copy, you may access the free text here: opentextbookstore.com/precalc/
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced Precalculus

      This course is designed for students who have done very well in Algebra II. Advanced Precalculus covers all of the topics studied in the regular pre-calculus course; however, the pace is slightly faster than regular pre-calculus so that the students will be able to cover more trigonometry and topics that will prepare them for AP Calculus. By the end of the class the students will not only be introduced to topics that are vital to understanding Calculus, such as continuity and limits, but they will also be introduced to the derivative through the limit definition.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      Students should download the free, online version of THIS TEXT as we will supplement this resource with other materials throughout the year. Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
    • Calculus

      Calculus begins with a thorough review of standard high school mathematics in preparation for Calculus and the SAT. The class is designed to introduce students to important Calculus topics and to prepare them for college Calculus. The course will cover the conceptual basis of Calculus including the limit definition of the derivative and Riemann Sums. It will also cover in great detail the rules for differentiation and introduce the integral. By the end of the class students will be exposed to the applications of Calculus with Related Rate and Optimization problems.

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       Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • AP Calculus AB

      AP Calculus is primarily concerned with developing a student’s understanding of the concepts of calculus through the use of the unifying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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       Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • AP Calculus BC

      AP Calculus BC is a semester course designed for students who have completed AP Calculus AB. The course is a continuation of Calculus AB and emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The course will cover advanced integration, differential equations, sequences and series, (including Taylor Series and Maclaurin Series), polar functions, and parametric functions. Students are expected to take the AP Calculus BC exam in May.

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       Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Linear Algebra

      Linear Algebra is a semester course for students who have completed AP Calculus AB and/or BC. There are widespread applications of Linear Algebra to business, engineering, and higher level mathematics. The main topics covered are systems of linear equations, matrices, Gaussian elimination, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Students explore a wide range of applications and may use computer software.

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       Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Topics in Mathematics

      In this year-long course, students study mathematics in contexts and develop their abilities to problem solve, reason, and communicate. Real world situations provide the contexts for mathematical investigation. The topics include but are not limited to: logic, numeration, statistics, financial mathematics, history of mathematics, and functions.

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      Please have a TI-84 Plus calculator. No textbook required.
    • AP Statistics

      This is the high school equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college statistics course. In this course, students develop strategies for collecting, organizing, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data, with a focus on univariate and bivariate data. Simulations and probability aid students in constructing models for chance phenomena and lead to the study of inference, where students learn to complete confidence intervals and hypotheses tests. Students use technology, such as the Ti calculator, Fathom, and online applets, to strengthen their understanding of statistical concepts. Throughout the year, students apply statistical skills learned in class to analyze data from a variety of sources, including data from our athletic teams, student-generated data, and online sources. The coursework culminate with AP exam in May.

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      Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • AP Computer Science

      This year-long course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data(algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. The course is designed For 11th and 1 zth grade students who have completed Algebra 2 with a grade of B or higher.

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      Please have a TI-84 Plus calculator. No textbook required.
    • AP Economics

      Description coming soon.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
       Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • STEM Robotics I

      As an introductory course in robotics the students will learn JAVA computer programming as well as problem solving strategies. This course will involve students in the development, building and programming of a Tetrix robot. Working in teams they design, build, program and document their progress. Topics include motor control, gear ratios, torque, friction, sensors, timing, program loops, logic gates, decision-making, timing sequences, propulsion systems and binary number systems. Student designed robots will be programmed to compete in a variety of autonomous and remote controlled challenges.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      No textbook required.
    • STEM Robotics II

      The STEM Robotics II course builds upon the skills students learned in STEM Robotics I. Working in teams, students will design, build, and program Tetrix robots which must complete more complex and more precise tasks with less margin for error than the projects in STEM Robotics I.

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      No textbook required.
  • MODERN & CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

    • French 1

      The goals of the first two years of French are to develop concurrently the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose the student to the culture of the francophonic world. At the more advanced levels, the department emphasizes the development of reading and writing skills through the study of literature and current cultural texts, while continuing to provide grammar review. An Advanced Placement course is offered to qualified students with the permission of the department and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      ISBN#: 978-1-68005-799-7 (2019 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2019 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning. 
    • French 2

      The goals of the first two years of French are to develop concurrently the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose the student to the culture of the francophonic world. At the more advanced levels, the department emphasizes the development of reading and writing skills through the study of literature and current cultural texts, while continuing to provide grammar review. An Advanced Placement course is offered to qualified students with the permission of the department and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      ISBN#: 978-1-68005-821-5 (2019 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2019 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.  
    • French 3

      French 3 is an intermediate course in French language and culture, bridging the levels of beginning language to advanced study. During the year, students continue their study of French grammar and become more proficient at interpreting, reading, speaking and writing directly in the language. Students also continue their study of French and francophone cultures around the world.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      ISBN#: 978-1-68005-843-7 (2019 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2019 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.
    • French 4

      French 4 continues the study of French language and serves as the preparatory year for Advanced Placement French Language and Culture. Students develop greater proficiency in the details of French language through the study of advanced grammar, readings, discussion, and composition. The goals of the course are to develop the ability to discuss one's ideas coherently and logically in spoken and written French and to deepen one's knowledge and understanding of French civilization and francophone culture through readings in French and francophone literature.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-54332-007-7 *
      *Note: we have secured special pricing for this book. Click on the book above and you will be asked to create a Vista Higher Learning account. After you make an account, you should automatically be brought to the page to buy the book at the discounted price. 
    • AP French Language and Culture

      The AP French Language and Culture course emphasizes continued language acquisition, communication skills, and cultural knowledge and understanding. The course will be conducted exclusively in French, and students will practice on a daily basis their interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication and expression. The course organizes the study of literature, current events, and cultural topics under the umbrella of the six College Board designated themes: Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Global Challenges, Aesthetics and Beauty, Family and Communities, and Private and Public Identities. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-68004-034-0 *
      *Note: Click on the book above and you will be asked to create a Vista Higher Learning account. After you make an account, you should automatically be brought to the page to buy the book. 
    • Latin 4

      Fourth year Latin is a continuation of an exploration of Latin literature. We begin the year with a number of letters of Pliny the Younger. With Pliny, we also use the Penguin translation alongside the text to examine more closely the difference between literal and literary translating. Texts for the remainder of the year vary according to student interest and have included works of Horace, Cicero, Vergil, Catullus, and Livy, as well as some mediaeval authors. Often, the year will end with an introduction to the AP syllabus of the following year.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Mandarin Chinese 1

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • Mandarin Chinese 2

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

      Order Your Textbook(s)

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • Mandarin Chinese 3

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

      Order Your Textbook(s)

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • Mandarin Chinese 4

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

      Order Your Textbook(s)

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • Mandarin Chinese 5

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

      Order Your Textbook(s)

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • Spanish 1

      The aim of the first two years of Spanish is to help students achieve a mastery of basic written and spoken language, and to introduce Spanish and Hispanic history and culture. The Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 courses stress vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Students and teachers use internet sources alongside the textbook to engage with real-life situations, current events and to look at the cultural differences and similarities between what we study and the students' own experiences.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
       ISBN #: 978-1-68004-519-2 (2017 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2017 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning. 
       
      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook (2017 edition) from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-68004-491-1.
       
      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Third Edition, 2017).
    • Spanish 2

      The aim of the first two years of Spanish is to help students achieve a mastery of basic written and spoken language, and to introduce Spanish and Hispanic history and culture. The Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 courses stress vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Students and teachers use internet sources alongside the textbook to engage with real-life situations, current events and to look at the cultural differences and similarities between what we study and the students' own experiences.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      ISBN #: 978-1-68004-664-9

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2017 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning. 
       
      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook (2017 edition) from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-68004-637-3.
       
      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Third Edition, 2017).
    • Spanish 3

      In the third and fourth years, students continue to expand their working vocabularies and grammatical understanding, and focus on writing and speaking with fluidity and idiomatic language. Students will study not only literary selections in Spanish, but will also use current events, pop culture, art and historical events to practice the language and increase their cultural understanding of the many Spanish-speaking regions of the world. These courses are conducted almost exclusively in Spanish.
      Order Your Textbook(s)
      ISBN#: 978-1-68004-715-8
      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2017 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning. 

      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook (2017 edition) from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-68004-689-2.

      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Third Edition, 2017).
    • Spanish 4

      In the third and fourth years, students continue to expand their working vocabularies and grammatical understanding, and focus on writing and speaking with fluidity and idiomatic language. Students will study not only literary selections in Spanish, but will also use current events, pop culture, art and historical events to practice the language and increase their cultural understanding of the many Spanish-speaking regions of the world. These courses are conducted almost exclusively in Spanish.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      (Spanish edition) 

      ISBN#: 978-1-68005-700-3 (2019 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the Imagina textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the Imagina book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2019 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.

      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook (2019 edition) from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-68005-683-9.

      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Fourth Edition, 2019).
    • AP Spanish Language

      The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes continued language acquisition, communication skills, and cultural knowledge and understanding. The course will be conducted exclusively in Spanish, and students will practice on a daily basis their interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication and expression. The course organizes the study of literature, current events, and cultural topics under the umbrella of the six College Board designated themes: Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Global Challenges, Aesthetics and Beauty, Family and Communities, and Private and Public Identities. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

      Order Your Textbook(s)

      Note: Students will need both a book and access to the SupersitePlease use the following Supersite access code if you are purchasing a used book: 978-1-61857-226-4

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • AP Spanish Literature

      The AP Spanish Literature and Culture course is a survey of Spanish and Hispanic literary works ranging from the 13th century to the 21st century. Students read and analyze poetry, prose, essays and theater pieces from several time periods, including such notable works as Cervantes' El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (excerpts), Lorca's La casa de Bernarda Alba, and poetry by Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Students refine their analytical writing skills through comparative essays and shorter, interpretive pieces. Much of the class time is spent discussing the readings; students thus hone their speaking skills as well. The class is conducted exclusively in Spanish. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

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      If you purchase a used textbook, make sure there is no writing in it.

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
  • THEOLOGY & RELIGIOUS STUDIES

    • Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature

      Do you have a Bible on your shelf somewhere but you’ve never really read it? Did you know the Bible is more of a library than a book? Are the readings in chapel a total mystery to you? Have you ever encountered a biblical reference in another book and wished you knew more? Are you or a loved one named after a figure in the Bible but know little about the namesake? Do you ever wonder how and why the Bible animates historical and contemporary political speech and action? Do you ever wonder what are some of the biblical sources that undergird Western theories of law and justice? Do you appreciate great writing? Do you wish someday to be able to call yourself well-read?

      The Bible as Literature is an upper-level semester course which provides an additional choice for students seeking to satisfy the graduation requirement in Theology & Religious Studies.  Cross-listed with the English dept, the course is listed as ENG on the transcript.

      METHOD: The course provides an introduction to the Judeo-Christian canon of biblical texts as works of sacred literature and rhetoric.  Students will explore the range of biblical genres through a survey of its historical, prophetic, poetic, sophistic, liturgical, gospel, and apocalyptic literatures.  With analysis of character, plot, form, literary devices, and redaction, they will learn to decipher and defend their own interpretive and rhetorical choices as biblical readers.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Ethics

      This course introduces students to a variety of ethical strategies from both philosophical and theological sources. Students investigate the theoretical underpinnings and the practical applications of ethical systems through case studies, class discussion, and debate. Students will reflect on their own communities of formation and explore and develop their own tools for moral reasoning. The course culminates with independent research on a pressing moral problem of the student's choosing. Students will present the case to the class, solicit peer review, and write a final position paper that demonstrates the learning goals of research, logical thinking, and effective argumentation.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • World Religions

      The one-semester World Religions course cultivates students' cultural and analytical reasoning, expands their capacities for empathy and creative imagination, develops their reflective and moral sensibilities, and builds foundational knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • PERFORMING ARTS

      • A Capella

        1. A Capella will be working on a variety of pieces written for mixed voice group singing, with the opportunity for solo and group work. The aim of each semester will be to expose students to the extensive world of A Capella. They will perform a concert each semester, with many other performance opportunities including chapel, assembly, and competing at the International Competition of High School Acapella (ICHSA.) The course will especially appeal to students who are interested in furthering their knowledge and abilities in singing and general musical knowledge.

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          No textbook required.
      • Band

        1. Students will play a variety of genres of music based on the abilities and instruments provided in the group as it varies year to year. The aim of each semester will be to expose students to a breadth of music, work on playing as an ensemble, solo/improvisation work, basic music comprehension and putting on a concert. The ensemble performs throughout the year at many school events and will have access to use of the ProTool’s recording studio.
        2. Prior individual instruction is required for enrollment in the course; This instruction does not need to have been taken at Holderness.

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        No textbook required.
      • Introduction to Music Theory

        1. This introductory music course will focus on basic music reading, notation comprehension and rudimentary keyboard skills. The student does not need to be able to read music, as they will learn all the basic building blocks for music: note names and values, key signatures, intervals, scales and basic chord progressions. This work will be mirrored on the keyboard.

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        No textbook required.
      • Music Production

        Description coming soon.

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        No textbook required.
      • Theater

        1. From auditions to performance, this course takes students through the creative process of staging a production. Depending on the season, students serve as the production staff for the school play and are responsible for the major aspects of the show. During the course, the students also study the fundamentals of acting, drama, improvisation, playwriting and analysis, storytelling and theater basics.
        2. This theater course is designed to give students an increased appreciation of and additional experience in theater as an art form.

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        No textbook required.
      • Acting and Scene Study

        1. This semester-long course is designed to give students the opportunity to create advanced work in the areas of acting, directing, playwriting, and video production. Student will acquire and develop the basic skills of acting while increasing their comfort level with performing on stage.
        2. Through monologues, scenes, and exercises, students will examine the techniques an actor uses to develop a character. Exercises include movement, sense memory, personalization, objective, beat work, and beginning text analysis. In this course, there will also be opportunities to analyze, critique, and construct meanings from informal and formal theater, video, and film.
        3. This course is open to 11th grade and 12th grade students only.


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        No textbook required.
      • Comedy & Improv

        Through the viewing of a variety of comedic entertainment sources such as SNL, various sitcoms, comedy films, satirical news shows, and stand up comedians, the class will deconstruct the humor and find the formulas, and techniques that are employed when writing and creating comedy.  From the rule of 3's to truth in comedy, students will explore and gain an understanding of the elements of comedy that make something humorous.  

        This sketch comedy class is also designed to develop improv, acting, and comedy through teaching the craft of sketch comedy writing and improvisational acting.  Many students believe they have the ability to make things up and in this course, you will continue to develop those skills as well as learn the skills for creating and writing comedy. It will also help you use those skills to develop comedic scenes, characters, and sketches.

        Course Student Learning Outcomes:   
        1. Develop the understanding and skill of what makes a comedic character
        2. Allows you to adopt a more YES, AND attitude!
        3. Improves your ability to think on your feet
        4. Develops your  listening skills
        5. Increases your level of connection to others
        6. Find the humor in everything!
        7. Ability to laugh at yourself!
        8. Develop the knowledge and awareness of the elements of comedy
        9. To explore the use of improvisational and performance skills for the actor's process. 
        10. To enhance listening, observation, and ensemble building ability necessary for a successful actor.
        11. To develop an atmosphere in which the individual accepts and integrates external evaluation.
        These learning outcomes will be assessed through written assessments, assignments, performances, improv exercises, and activities. 

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        No textbook required.
      • Creative Movement

        1. This performance-based course is designed to help each student become a versatile, adaptable and creative dancer, choreographer and communicator. Thecourse begins with a foundation of basic dance steps necessary to put together simple combinations to create choreography for different genres of music. This provides students with technique and skills at levels appropriate to the experience they bring with them. Students are engaged with four core elements of dance: basic dance steps, combinations, theories and contexts, and projects and performance. These elements are taught through daily class warm ups, exercises and practice, and in individual and group work. Students will dance during every class.
        2. The goal of this course if for students to develop their individual movement language with an emphasis on fusing physical practices and creative collaboration while building a dance vocabulary.
        3. Juniors & Seniors only.


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        No textbook required.
  • VISUAL ARTS

    • Studio Practices I

      1. Student artists in the Studio Practices course will experiment with a variety of media to create visual art during the semester long course. The elements of art (line, shape, space, color, value, texture, and form) are applied in two-dimensional Drawing, Painting and Design lessons. Students will begin to apply the principles of design, (rhythm/ movement, balance, proportion/ scale, variety/ unity, emphasis, contrast and repetition) in their art expression. The development and application of artistic techniques and skills are emphasized.
      2. Students will express their ideas by using art as a form of communication and will develop the confidence and ability to evaluate and discuss their own work and the work of others. As students work toward an appreciation and understanding of art, they will relate visual arts to various historical and cultural traditions. Students will learn to respect their own ideas and artistic expressions and those of others as they analyze and evaluate works of art.
      3. Students will develop Final Portfolios that will be assessed after each lesson and at the end of the semester with the guidance of specific grading rubrics and group critiques.

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      No textbook required.
    • Studio Practices II

      1. This advanced course is a study of the principles and elements of art using a variety of studio media to explore compositional possibilities on a two-dimensional surface or three-dimensional space. The elements of design are like a palette of possibilities that artists use to express themselves. The principles of design help guide artists in making decisions about how to organize the elements on a picture plane or in physical space in order to communicate content. In order to think critically about visual design, this course will begin with a practical approach to solving visual problems while introducing the vocabulary of visual terms and visual analysis.
      2. Through structured studio experiences, students will learn the intrinsic qualities of various media and develop an understanding of compositional strategies, technical skills and design processes. The importance of good craftsmanship and a professional approach to studio practices will be emphasized along with the experimental and imaginative manipulation of form and content. Increasing emphasis will be placed on subjectivity, content and conceptual development in student work.
      3. Students will develop Final Portfolios that will be assessed after each lesson and at the end of the semester with the guidance of specific grading rubrics and group critiques.

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      No textbook required.
    • 2D Digital Design

      1. This semester long course is a hands-on digital art & design course with strong emphasis on graphic communication. Students will develop their creative process through brainstorming and sketching, explore design principles and elements, and practice digital image manipulation. Assignments include: personal branding, logo, business card & letterhead design. Depending on student interest, potential projects include infographic, package, sticker, poster, album, and t-shirt design.
      2. Students will use Adobe Illustrator Creative Cloud to develop vector images. Other technology and software may be used following the interests and needs of students.
      3. The goals of this course are for students to develop their creative process, learn and practice the foundations of design, discover how design permeates other areas of study, and explore potential career paths. In addition, students will engage in active observation and conversation about work produced by themselves and by their classmates, as well as visual references to historical and contemporary design.

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      No textbook required.
    • AP 2D Art & Design

      AP Studio Art provides the opportunity for the visually inclined students to excel and receive recognition on a national level. It allows students to compare their work with other high school students throughout the nation, and helps them prepare an excellent portfolio for study at the college level. All students enrolling in the course are expected to submit an AP Portfolio. 

      AP Studio Art: Drawing/ 2D/ 3D is a two-semester course that focuses on producing a large number of quality works that demonstrate mastery of fundamental artistic concepts. In their work, students will investigate all three components of the AP Portfolio; Quality, Concentration and Breadth. Students will further develop their technical skills and creative thought processes as they find their own way to communicate visually. Students will also be presented with problems that require unconventional and imaginative solutions. This fast paced course requires the student to be highly motivated and interested in the serious study of art, which may lead to college credit. Motivation, imagination and commitment are required to succeed in the course. 

      There are three portfolio types in AP Studio Art. A Drawing Portfolio, a 2D Portfolio and a 3D portfolio. Descriptions for each to follow. 

      The AP Drawing Portfolio is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth are drawing issues that can be addressed through a variety of means, which could include painting, printmaking, mixed media, etc. Abstract, observational, and inventive works may demonstrate drawing competence. The range of marks used to make drawings, the arrangement of those marks, and the materials used to make the marks are endless. Projects will be structured around the elements of art and principles of design. In these projects, students will need to use their knowledge of technique and materials to communicate through their art. This encourages students to use critical thinking skills, while also developing their own voices as visual artists. Thus, students will develop mastery in concept, composition, and execution of their personal artistic vision. 

      The purpose of AP Studio Art: 2-D Design is to provide an intensive study of the process of creating two-dimensional design (2-D) artwork using both traditional fine and digital art media (materials and tools). Emphasis is placed on the quality, breadth and concentration of the student’s production and experiences in digital art, photography, drawing, and design. Projects will be structured around the elements of art and principles of design. In these projects, students will need to use their knowledge of technique and materials to communicate through their art. This encourages students to use critical thinking skills, while also developing their own voices as visual artists. Thus, students will develop mastery in concept, composition, and execution of their personal artistic vision. 

      The purpose of AP Studio Art: 3-D Design is to provide an intensive study of the process of creating three-dimensional (3-D) artwork using the elements and principles of design in an integrative way. Emphasis is placed on the quality, breadth and concentration of the student’s understanding of design principles relating to Space and Depth. In these projects, students will need to use their knowledge of technique and materials to communicate through their art. This encourages students to use critical thinking skills, while also developing their own voices as visual artists. Thus, students will develop mastery in concept, construction, and presentation of their personal artistic vision.


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      No textbook required.
    • Photography I

      1. Photography I will establish a solid photographic foundation in a hands-on teaching environment by introducing students to the magic and craft of digital photography. Students will learn basic photographic techniques using professional digital cameras in manual exposure mode. They will be tasked with slowing down and becoming proficient in aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings in various lighting situations. Students will work individually as well as collaboratively in groups while discussing the photographic merits of particular places and shooting at different times of day.
      2. Students will learn how to see and recognize the quality of light, color and tone when making photographs as well as how to compose an image, and how capture a photographic moment. They will also be introduced to studio lighting, Adobe Photoshop and learn how to print professional quality photographs.
      3. Students will take part in meaningful group discussions and critiques of their work. They will learn how to give and accept constructive criticism of their and their classmates’ photographs while working on assignments and a small personal project. Students will also experience the analog traditional darkroom and make their own pin-hole cameras.
      4. In short, students will learn diverse photographic techniques with an emphasis on how to see and create meaningful and powerful photographs they can be proud of.

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      Media Literacy Required Reading: Students will be required to regularly read one of several mainstream news outlets, such as the New York Times or the Wall Street Journal for class discussions about news and culture.
    • Photography II

      1. Photography II begins where Photography I left off. Students will continue using professional digital cameras and learn additional Adobe Photoshop techniques. Emphasis will be placed on further developing talent, artistic expression and documentary communication in a hands-on environment. Students will be exposed to modern and contemporary photography and will study the work of influential photographers. We will often work together shooting as a group while discussing the photographic merits of particular places, quality of light and shooting at different times of day. Students will also have access to professional lighting equipment they can use in the studio as well as out on location.
      2. Students will also take part in meaningful group critiques of their work and consider standards and ethics in art and documentary practice. The class will have an emphasis on creativity and diverse interpretation of assignments as well as a personal project of the students’ choosing.
      3. The class will also look at photography that illustrates diverse cultures at home and abroad as well as photography that takes an activist approach. Students will learn how to present photographs in murals, print portfolio, on the web and mounted on a wall.

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      Media Literacy Required Reading: Students will be required to regularly read one of several mainstream news outlets, such as the New York Times or the Wall Street Journal for class discussions about news and culture.
    • Photography III

      1. Photography III is for advanced photographers who wish to immerse themselves further into photographic practice. The curriculum is geared towards a student’s interest: whether it be abstraction, portraiture, documentary, landscape, digital or traditional film and darkroom techniques. Emphasis is placed on creating personal work and spending time deeply involved in longer-term projects using photography to create a series of images that work together.
      2. Students will regularly view classic and contemporary photography and take part in group discussions and critiques. They will be required to present their long-term project(s) in either book form, murals, alternative techniques, print portfolio, on the web or mounted on a wall.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • 3D Foundations

      1. Course description coming soon.

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      No textbook required.
    • Ceramics II

      1. These semester courses are open to all students who have completed the prerequisite ceramics course. Classes are tailored to each student, focusing on individual interests. Ceramics students are expected to increase their technical proficiency, explore a diversity of forms, and employ a variety of glazing techniques.
      2. Students learn terms and definitions in order to become more familiar with the technical aspects of ceramics. They are introduced to a number of resources in the library, and see videos of famous ceramic artists.

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      No textbook required.
    • Ceramics III

      1. These semester courses are open to all students who have completed the prerequisite ceramics course. Classes are tailored to each student, focusing on individual interests. Ceramics students are expected to increase their technical proficiency, explore a diversity of forms, and employ a variety of glazing techniques.
      2. Students learn terms and definitions in order to become more familiar with the technical aspects of ceramics. They are introduced to a number of resources in the library, and see videos of famous ceramic artists.

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      No textbook required.
    • Filmmaking I

      1. Students will be introduced to the technical and fundamental skills needed to create short films using digital video cameras and Adobe Premiere Pro. They will study conceptual aspects of narrative storytelling in documentary and fiction. The class will emphasize creativity, personal vision and collaboration. We will view many films and scenes from various genres as creative examples for both technique and inspiration. Students will be challenged to consider the images and videos we make and view in order to improve visual literacy in the fast-paced visual culture we live in. The course will involve hands-on training while working towards a final project.
      2. During the course each student will be taught:
        · How to tell a story through video
        · The basic principles of how to capture video and audio
        · How to edit video and audio

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      No textbook required.
    • Filmmaking II

      1. Students will continue their filmmaking education with an emphasis on narrative storytelling and self-expression in documentary and fiction. Students will work to develop their personal vision in a hands-on creative environment individually as well as collaboratively in groups. Craft and creating compelling films with emotional impact are of principal importance in this class. Students will shoot with professional grade DSLR cameras and audio equipment as they fulfill creative, enjoyably and gratifying assignments while working towards a final project. Students enrolled in this course will gain more experience with writing screenplays and creating storyboards for film projects. We will also view films and regularly have constructive group discussions and critiques. Filmmaking I, or equivalent, is required to sign-up for this course.
      2. During the course each student will be taught:
        · How to tell an impactful and emotive story
        · Expand their knowledge of composition and lighting
        · Further develop their editing techniques in Adobe Premier Pro

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      No textbook required.
  • OTHER COURSES

    • Human Development

      Human Development is a quarter-long course covering topics such as human sexuality,reproductive anatomy, gender roles and identity, sexual orientation, birth control, and teen pregnancy. In addition to the human sexuality component, the course discusses the dangers of drug and alcohol use. Human Development is a pass/fail course.

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      No textbook required.
    • Senior Thesis

      Senior Thesis is an experiential educational opportunity designed to provide seniors with the platform to develop their intellectual curiosity while researching and delving into the exploration of a topic of their choosing. While the essential question they create is central, it is the educational journey the students take to address that question which is most important. Included in that experience are the following components of Senior Thesis:

      Researching and annotating
      Communicating with mentors
      Interviewing experts
      Writing a literature review
      Planning and completing a March Experience
      Presenting to the community

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      No textbook required.
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 9

    SubjectCourse
    English English 9: Humanities
    Foreign Language French 1 or French 2
    Mandarin Chinese 1 or Mandarin Chinese 2
    Spanish 1 or Spanish 2
    History Foundations of Modern Society (required semester course)
    Science Biology
    Mathematics Algebra 1
    Geometry
    Algebra 2 (for students who have successfully completed Algebra 1 and Geometry)
    Visual & Performing Arts Ninth Grade Art Foundations (required semester course)
    Semester Course Electives
    (suggested for students who have already completed biology, or who prefer to take biology in grade 10)
    Studio Practices I
    3D Foundations (completion of Studio Practices recommended)
    Photography I (completion of Studio Practices recommended)
    Filmmaking I (completion of Studio Practices recommended)
    Theater
    Band (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
    A Capella (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 10

    Students are required to take five courses each semester, plus Human Development for one quarter. Students may propose to take more or fewer classes by writing a formal proposal to the Academic Committee.
    SubjectCourse
    English English 10: Global Literatures
    Foreign Language French 2 or French 3
    Mandarin Chinese 2 or Mandarin Chinese 3
    Spanish 2 or Spanish 3
    History US History 1 (semester course)
    US History 2 Seminar (semester course)
    Advanced History of the West (for qualified 10th and 11th graders)
    Science Biology
    Chemistry (for students who have successfully completed Biology)
    Honors Chemistry (for students who are very strong in math and science)
    Mathematics Geometry
    Algebra 2 (for students who have successfully completed Geometry)
    Honors Algebra 2 (for students who are very strong in math)
    Precalculus or Honors Precalculus (for students who are very strong in math)
    Theology & Religious Studies World Religions (semester course)
    Human Development Human Development (required quarter course)
    Semester Course Electives in Visual & Performing Arts Studio Practices I
    Studio Practices II (for students who have successfully completed Studio Practices I)
    2D Digital Design
    3D Foundations
    Ceramics II (for students who have successfully completed 3D Foundations)
    Photography I
    Photography II (for students who have successfully completed Photography I)
    Filmmaking I
    Filmmaking II (for students who have successfully completed Filmmaking I)
    Theater
    Intro to Acting
    Creative Movement
    Band (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
    A Capella (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
    *Please see our AP requirements
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 11

    Students are required to take five courses each semester. Students may propose to take more or fewer classes by writing a formal proposal to the Academic Committee.
    SubjectCourse
    English Advanced English Seminars
    AP Language & Composition*
    AP Literature*
    Foreign Language French 3, French 4 or AP French Language and Culture*
    French Food & Culture (semester course—for students who have successfully completed French 3 or French 4)
    Latin 4
    Mandarin Chinese 3, Mandarin Chinese 4, or Mandarin Chinese 5
    Spanish 3, Spanish 4, AP Spanish Language or AP Spanish Literature*
    Advanced Spanish: Protestas (for students who have successfully completed Spanish 3 or Spanish 4)
    History AP US/AP European History: Advanced History of the West* (for qualified 10th and 11th graders)
    AP Comparative Government & Politics*
    AP European History*
    Ancient Greece (semester course)
    Enlightenment and Romanticism (semester course)
    Intro to Philosophy (semester course)
    Political Media (semester course)
    Post War American Intellectual History (semester course)
    Psychology 1 (sesemester course)
    Psychology 2 (semester course)
    The Modern Middle East (semester course)
    Women and Warfare (semester course)
    Science Chemistry
    Honors Chemistry
    Physics (for students who are at the pre-calculus level or above)
    Honors Physics (for students who are at the pre-calculus level or above)
    AP Physics C: Mechanics* (for students who have successfully completed Physics and AP Calculus)
    AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism* (for students who have successfully completed AP Physics C: Mechanics)
    Environmental Science (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Biology* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Environmental Science* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Exercise Physiology (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Neuroscience (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Nutrition (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    STEM: Robotics I (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Mathematics Algebra 2 (for students who have successfully completed Geometry)
    Precalculus (for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    Honors Precalculus or Advanced Precalculus (for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2 and seek a fast-paced course in preparation for AP Calculus)
    Calculus (for students who have successfully completed Precalculus)
    AP Calculus AB*
    AP Calculus BC*
    Linear Algebra
    Topic in Mathematics (for students who have successfully completed Algebra 2)
    Computer Science (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    AP Computer Science*
    AP Economics*
    AP Statistics* 
    STEM: Robotics I (semester course)
    Visual & Performing Arts All courses are available to 11th grade students
    Theology & Religious Studies Ethics (semester course)
    Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature (semester course)
    *Please see our AP requirements
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 12

    Students are required to take five courses each semester. Students may propose to take more or fewer classes by writing a formal proposal to the Academic Committee.
    SubjectCourse
    English Advanced English Seminars
    AP Language & Composition*
    AP Literature*
    Foreign Language French 4 or AP French Language and Culture*
    French Food & Culture (semester course—for students who have successfully completed French 3 or French 4)
    Latin 4
    Mandarin Chinese 3, Mandarin Chinese 4 or Mandarin Chinese 5
    Spanish 4, AP Spanish Language* or AP Spanish Literature*
    Advanced Spanish: Protestas (semester course)
    History AP Comparative Government & Politics*
    AP European History*
    Ancient Greece (semester course)
    Enlightenment and Romanticism (semester course—offered on a bi-annual basis)
    Intro to Philosophy (semester course)
    Political Media (semester course—open to qualified 11th and 12th grade students; offered on a bi-annual basis)
    Post War American Intellectual History (semester course—open to qualified 11th and 12th grade students; offered on a bi-annual basis)
    Psychology 1 (semester course)
    Psychology 2 (semester course)
    The Modern Middle East (semester course—open to qualified 11th and 12th grade students; offered on a bi-annual basis)
    Women and Warfare (semester course)
    Science Chemistry
    Honors Chemistry (recommended only for students who are very strong in math & science)
    Physics or Honors Physics (recommended for students who are at a Precalculus level of math or above)
    AP Biology* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Environmental Science or AP Environmental Science* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Physics C Mechanics* (open to qualified 11th and 12th grade students; must have successfully completed Physics and AP Calculus)
    AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism (open to students who have completed the AP Physics C: Mechanics course)
    Exercise Physiology (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Neuroscience (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Nutrition (semester course)
    STEM: Robotics I or Stem Robotics II (semester course—must have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Mathematics Precalculus, Honors Precalculus or Advanced Precalculus (for students who have successfully completed Algebra 2 and Geometry)
    Topic in Mathematics (must have successfully completed Algebra 2)
    Calculus (must have successfully completed Precalculus)
    AP Calculus AB*
    AP Calculus BC*
    Linear Algebra
    AP Statistics*
    Computer Science (semester course)
    AP Computer Science* (must have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    AP Economics
    STEM Robotics I or Stem Robotics II (semester course)
    Visual & Performing Arts All courses are available to 12th grade students
    Theology & Religious Studies Ethics (semester course)
    Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature (semester course)
    Senior Thesis Required year-long course
    *Please see our AP requirements


Holderness School
33 Chapel Lane, Holderness, NH 03245

MAIL P.O. Box 1879 Plymouth, NH 03264-1879
PHONE (603) 536-1257
EMAIL info@holderness.org