Welcome to our online Curriculum and Registration Guide!

Make sure to read the 2020-21 Letter from the Dean of Academic Affairs and then please use the resources below to better understand the offerings and requirements of our academic program.

Course Numbering Plan - Clarifying Levels of Courses   

Beginning with the class of 2025 transcripts at Holderness will list “Course Codes” which will include a Departmental Code (i.e. HIST for history and MATH for math) and a number between 100-699. The first digit corresponds with the level of the course which is further explained below, the second digit signifies an honors class if it is above 50 and third digit is simply a course identifier and does not indicate a specific “level”. We believe this will further support our students in the college admissions process to clarify their courses. It also allows us to demonstrate the rigor of a course without the term A.P; this may be particularly useful for a course such as Linear Algebra--a post AP Calculus BC course-- or Enlightenment and Romanticism, a semester-elective often taken by students as a follow-up to A.P. Euro. 

Starting in 2021-2022 we will begin to use this language internally as well to inform course sign ups, support clear homework expectations and more generally indicate the rigor of a course (see chart below). The terms “honors”, “advanced” and “Advanced Placement” will remain in the titles of the courses. 

Level 1 = 100 
Level 2 = 200
Level 3 = 300
Level 4 = 400
Level 5 = 500
Level 6 = 600
Courses that introduce a subject or discipline, typically taken by 9th or 10th grade students.
Courses that are second in a sequence, typically taken by 9th or 10th grade students and open to 11th grade students
Courses that are third in a sequence, or elective courses typically taken by 11th and 12th grade students. 
Courses that are fourth in a sequence, or some elective courses typically taken by 11th and 12th grade students 
Courses that are equivalent to college freshman classes, sometimes, indicated by preparation for an AP. 
Courses that would be taken for a major, or for typically taken after the first year of college. Has a 500  prereq.
Avg. Homework
30-45 min 
Avg. Homework 
30-45 min 
Avg. Homework 
30-45 min
Avg. Homework 
45-50 min
Avg. Homework 
60-75 min
Avg. Homework 
60-75 min 
 

Course Requirements

Subject Area Requirement
English Four years
Foreign Language Two consecutive years of the same language
History Two years, including Foundations of Modern Society and US History
Science Two years, including one year of life science and one year of physical science
Mathematics Three years, including Geometry and Algebra II
Fine Arts Two semesters (check out our guide to this year's offerings)
Human Development One quarter; required only for 10th graders (students who enroll after 10th grade are exempt)
Theology & Religious Studies One semester
Senior Thesis Full year (full credit)

Students are required to take five full-credit courses during any year or term. This requirement applies to all students in all years, even when students have repeated a year of high school. A course in the Fine Arts counts as a full-credit course, with the exception of A Capella or Band, which may be taken as a sixth course. Human Development is also taken as a sixth course. Students who feel that the five-course load is too burdensome during any particular term must submit their request to the Academic Committee to carry a four-course load for that term. Requests will be considered only for students in extreme circumstances.

Interested in Advanced Placement classes?
Please see our AP Requirements here.

Students considering application to selective colleges should plan to take:
  • Three or more years of the same foreign language
  • Four years of math
  • Three or four years of science, including Chemistry and Physics

Course Offerings/Descriptions

Click on each department/course name to expand the description.
  • ENGLISH

    • ENG 101 | English 9: Humanities

    • ENG 201 | English 10: Global Literatures

      1. This course presents literary study through global social and cultural contexts.
      2. Students think deeply and write frequently about questions concerning their own identities in relation to social identifiers such as race, gender, ethnicity, nationality, sexual identity, religious belief, class, and privilege.
      3. Writing and other assignments link literary study with artistic expression, connecting the course with their March Artward Bound Experience.

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    • ENG 401 | Advanced English Seminar: Creative Non-Fiction

      In this class students will practice many forms of creative nonfiction from personal narratives to fact based persuasive essays. Each class starts with a writing exercise designed to tap creativity, prompt further writing, and create a culture of free expression. Students will learn literary techniques and develop their own writing process. In addition to writing, students will also read creative non-fiction about the writing process.

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    • ENG 402 | Advanced English Seminar: Literature of Survival

      How does an individual survive in the wilderness? How might a neglected child survive to become a well-adjusted adult? What do you do when you are left alone...in outer-space? In this class, students will explore the attributes necessary for one to survive difficult situations. Through reading a varied array of fictional tales and non-fictional stories and articles, students will uncover the characteristics of a survivor.

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    • ENG/THEO 403 | Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature

      Do you have a Bible on your shelf somewhere but you’ve never really read it? Did you know the Bible is more of a library than a book? Are the readings in chapel a total mystery to you? Have you ever encountered a biblical reference in another book and wished you knew more? Are you or a loved one named after a figure in the Bible but know little about the namesake? Do you ever wonder how and why the Bible animates historical and contemporary political speech and action? Do you ever wonder what are some of the biblical sources that undergird Western theories of law and justice? Do you appreciate great writing? Do you wish someday to be able to call yourself well-read?
       
      The Bible as Literature is an upper-level semester course which provides an additional choice for students seeking to satisfy the graduation requirement in Theology & Religious Studies.  Cross-listed with the English dept, the course is listed as ENG on the transcript.

      METHOD:
      The course provides an introduction to the Judeo-Christian canon of biblical texts as works of sacred literature and rhetoric.  Students will explore the range of biblical genres through a survey of its historical, prophetic, poetic, sophistic, liturgical, gospel, and apocalyptic literatures.  With analysis of character, plot, form, literary devices, and redaction, they will learn to decipher and defend their own interpretive and rhetorical choices as biblical readers.

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    • ENG 404 | Advanced English Seminar: The Good Life: Literature as a Guide to Life’s Big Questions

      Although we read and write fiction for all sorts of reasons—as a reprieve from everyday life, as an academic exercise, as sheer entertainment—one of the most powerful explanations has been put forth by the writer Joan Didion, who tells us that “we tell ourselves stories in order to live.” This course takes that notion and uses it as a lens through which to approach both classic and contemporary works of fiction. Students will read a number of famous and lesser known novels and short stories, as well as watch a selection of TedEx talks and other public pronouncements, in order to answer the question of what it means to live a good life. In doing so, they will learn how to approach fiction in a more philosophical and moral fashion. Ultimately, they will be tasked with using this evidence and their own experiences to produce a statement of their own personal philosophy as to what exactly a meaningful life looks like for them. 
       
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      Coming soon.
    • ENG 405 | Advanced English Seminar: The Novella

      Every November, more than half a million people participate in National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), a challenge in which individuals from all walks of life attempt to produce a complete rough draft of a novel in just thirty days. Taking inspiration from that idea and the numerous high schools across the country that participate in the project, this writing-focused class is designed to give students the skills, time, and support needed to produce their own Holderness version of NaNoWriMo: a complete rough draft of a novella (shorter than a novel) over the course of not a month but an entire semester. In doing so, students will learn how to structure narratives, create plots, develop characters, and produce sustained creative writing habits on their way to producing a lengthy work of creative fiction. 
       
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      Coming soon.
    • ENG 406 | Advanced English Seminar: Travel Writing in an Age of Isolation

      With recent threats of a pandemic, polarizing politics, environmental degradation, and increased isolationism, one might wonder if the era of unlimited, largely unfettered travel for pleasure has been forever changed. Is travel as we know it obsolete? Or does this era of new nationalism (with its suspicion of foreignness) forecast a kind of proud provincialism in which people feel safe and content sheltering at home? Will travel literature assume heightened status as the main gateway to experiencing “otherness”? In this course, students will ponder these questions and others, while exploring the art and craft of travel writing -- the long tradition of documenting and reflecting on encounters with the unfamiliar. They will both read exemplars of the best in travel writing and write their own narratives of place. 
       
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      Coming soon. Readings are likely to include works by Bruce Chatwin, Anthony Doerr, Mark Twain, Isabella Bird, Frances Mayes, and Elizabeth Gilbert, among others.
    • ENG 407 | Advanced English Seminar: Widening the River: American Voices Beyond the Mainstream

      A continuation and extension of Asian American Literature offered last fall, this course seeks to broaden the scope of the American Literary landscape, pulling in voices that have not always been read or heard. We will explore new classics in Asian-American, Pacific-Islander and Native-American literature with a focus on the storytelling traditions of those cultures, guided by the question, "What is the language and narrative structure of a 'hyphenated' American experience?" Readings are likely to include works by Maxine Hong Kingston Amy Tan, Louise Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, Garrett Hongo, Thi Bui, and Robin Wall Kimmerer, among others.

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      Also on the reading list:
      • Assorted essays by Chang Rae Lee (accessible through school subscription of The New Yorker); Robin Wall Kimmerer (from Braiding Sweetgrass), N. Scott Momaday, Amy Tan, and others
      • Poems by: Ocean Vuong, Li-Young Lee, Garrett Hongo, and others (to be provided by teacher)
      • Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich or There There by Tommy Orange (tbd; please hold off on ordering)
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    • ENG 501 | AP Language & Composition

      The course aims to further student understanding and appreciation of the English language, particularly language used to argue and persuade. The class will study the logic of English usage, learn new words, and read writing that exemplifies precision and rhetorical force. In the first semester, content and assignments in the course will center on understanding and clarifying personal values, and weighing these against accepted societal values. The second semester will explore specific means of persuasion employed in American society. Articulate, deliberate, precise language will be encouraged and reinforced in writing assignments, oral reports, and class discussions.

      Our curriculum is designed with two factors in mind. First, it is intended to further the language development fostered in earlier grades of our school’s English curriculum and prepare students (those juniors enrolled in the class) for their final year of secondary school. Second, it capitalizes on the specific goals of the Advanced Placement curriculum. The demands of the AP program divergent from our school’s traditional curriculum—among them the focus of specific rhetorical techniques and language and the development of image analysis skills—require our enrolled students to be especially dedicated and diligent.

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      *Additional texts to be determined by individual teachers.
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    • ENG 601 | AP Literature

      AP Literature and Composition focuses on the study of language used for artistic purposes. Students develop their analytical skills by reading poetry, novels, short stories, and plays. In addition to teaching students to appreciate the skillful use of rich, complex, evocative language, the class aims at developing students’ writing skills. Most of the writing in AP literature is analytic in nature, although some time is devoted to the college essay in September. The course is open to 12th graders and culminates in the taking of the Advanced Placement examination in May.

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      *Additional texts to be decided.
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  • HISTORY

    • HIST 101 | Foundations of Modern Society

      All ninth grade students are required to take Foundations of Modern Society, a one–semester course. Emphasizing fundamental historical thinking skills through diverse case studies, this course serves as a unifying academic experience for the students and is a foundation for their future studies in history. It is intentionally broad in scope and teachers employ 3-4 diverse content areas to grapple with the essential question: How do social groups form and thrive? While the specific units vary from year to year and teacher to teacher, there is a special focus on the role governments play in forming societies, the way perception of the “other” can form a group, and the way an idea can develop a group identity. There is an explicit focus on developing in each student an understanding that every source, primary or secondary, is an interpretation. To that end, teachers employ in each unit at least of two different historians’ interpretations of a historical event, several contrasting primary sources, and various visual interpretations in each unit. This course also shares a main essential question with the English I course, “How do I learn best?” and focuses on developing students’ metacognition about their individual learning processes.

      Potential and past unit topics (at individual teacher’s discretion):
      • Collective Learning and Early Human Evolution
      • Agricultural Revolution
      • The Development of Ancient States: Rome, China, Political Philosophy
      • The Holocaust and Comparative Genocide Studies
      • New Colonialism and the Belgian Congo
      • Apartheid South Africa
      • Jim Crow America
      • Communist Revolutions
      • The Industrial Revolution

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    • HIST 201 | US History 1

      This semester-length required US History course will be the starting point for all future historical inquiry at Holderness. The course will focus on the development of the Constitution and the Reconstruction eras. These foundational topics will introduce themes of a variety of civil liberties, but notably freedom of speech and suffrage. The essential question will be: What does it mean to be a US citizen?

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    • HIST 202 | US History 2: 20th Century Conflicts

      In complement to the fall semester of US History 1, this spring semester course will take an in-depth look at the major conflicts of the 20th century, examining the involvement of the American people and government. Through close readings of primary and secondary sources, students will further sharpen their own understanding of the content by engaging with their peers in daily class discussions. The course will place special emphasis on writing by continuing the skills progression initiated in US History 1. Conflicts to be considered most likely include: World War I and II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Vietnam War.

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      Coming soon.
    • HIST 203 | US History 2: A Bigger Government: The Great Depression and the New Deal

      Every facet of American society was rapidly changing at the turn of the 20th century and the modern American Identity was beginning to take shape. This semester elective will focus on the time period of 1900- 1945, primarily focusing on the how America got itself into the Great Depression and then how the Second World War, pulled America out of the Great Depression. We will look not only at the economic impacts of Depression but also the social and political impacts. Through primary and secondary source analysis, students will be forced to confirm and complicate the documents to further develop their own understandings of the time period. Lastly, we will also make connections to the 2008 Recession, the largest economic recession, since the Great Depression.

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      No textbook required.
    • HIST 204 | US History 2: A History of Native Americans in Northern New England

      This survey course will focus on the Abenaki, or “the people of the dawn,” and consider the sophisticated culture and society they had developed as First Peoples, the immediate impact of European invasion, the genocide that followed, and the struggle to reclaim sovereignty that continues to this day.

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      More information coming soon.
    • HIST 205 | US History 2: Remember the Ladies!: American Women's History

      The purpose of this course is to examine the role that women have played in the history of the United States from the start of the women’s rights movement to the present. We will look at the ways in which women have empowered themselves in the context of patriarchal oppression and assess the stumbling blocks they met in their quest for social, political, and economic equality. In so doing, we will elevate women to their rightful place in the larger study of history and better understand what it means to be a woman, a man, and a human being.

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      No textbook required.
    • HIST 301 | Ancient Greece

      In this survey course (with a thematic approach), students will learn the history of ancient Greece. Topics covered in this course include Greek warfare, the Trojan War, Greek mythology, the origins of democracy, the Golden Age of Athens, Sparta, The Persian Wars, The Peloponnesian War, and Alexander the Great. Students will learn how the ancient Greeks influenced modern society and how they left behind a rich cultural and political legacy that still affects us today.

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    • HIST 302 | Intro to Philosophy

      What do I know? Why do I exist? Where does evil come from? These are just some of the questions this course attempts to answer. Introduction to philosophy aims to teach students how philosophy emerged in ancient times, from the presocratics like Thales of Miletus, to more established and recognized ancient philosophers like Socrates and Aristotle, and how they influenced later thinkers like Hypatia and Seneca. Besides covering famous philosophers, this course attempts to introduce students to life’s most riveting questions using both ancient and modern philosophy, and philosophy in today’s popular media like Star Wars.

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      No textbook required.
    • HIST 401 | Psychology 1

      Psychology I concentrates on the study of the human mind and human behavior. It is broken down into four units:
      1. The History of Psychology
      2. Biological Psychology
      3. Developmental Psychology
      4. Social Psychology
      The course is designed to give students a foundation of psychology and lead to an interest in further study of psychology. Regardless of how far students go with their study of psychology, students will have a better understanding of the human mind and reasoning behind human behavior after this introductory course.

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      No textbook required.
    • HIST 402 | Psychology 2

      A semester-length opportunity for continued study in Psychology. The prerequisite is Psychology I, but these two courses do not have to be taken in the same calendar year (could be taken 11th and 12th grade for example). Psychology II includes topics such as learning and memory, motivation and emotion, intelligence testing and individual differences, and abnormal psychology. The course is an opportunity to dive deeper into the different types of psychology discussed in Psychology I, such as biological, developmental, cognitive, and social psychology.

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      No textbook required.
    • HIST 403 | The Modern Middle East

      Offered on a bi-annual basis. LIKELY NOT TO BE OFFERED IN 2022-23; interested rising juniors are advised to take in 2021-22.
      Open to 11th and 12th graders, this semester-long elective explores the complexity of one of the most paradoxical regions in the world. The Middle East encompasses some of the richest and poorest countries. It is the geographic foundation of the three largest world religions and is perhaps one of the most turbulent regions of the twenty-first century. This course examines the sources of today’s socio-political problems, including twentieth century imperialism, the Balfour Declaration, the Cold War, and globalization. This course seeks to determine what needs to change in order to create a viable peace in the Middle East.


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      No textbook required.
    • HIST 501 & 502 | AP US/AP European History: Advanced History of the West 1 & 2

      Application required
      This two year course, beginning in the 10th or 11th grade year, will prepare students for both the Advanced Placement European History Exam and the Advanced Placement US History Exam. Students must submit an application and will be vetted for admission. This course will employ a broader lens to explore historical phenomena on both sides of the Atlantic embracing the globalized approach of modern historical research. Study of the American constitution, for example, will be endowed with prior study of the Enlightenment. Students will be expected to engage in a project in the summer between the two years of the course. Students will take both exams, but may petition to take only one at the end of their second year of the course (in their junior or senior year). This course will be team taught (either two teachers ½ time, or two teachers full time) for the first iteration of the course.


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       (Year 1 texts)
      (Year 2 text)
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    • HIST 503 | AP Economics

      A year-long course which is broken into two parts AP Macroeconomics in the first semester and AP Microeconomics in the second semester. Macroeconomics will give students an understanding of the economy as a whole. Students will look at what is happening at a national level. This course allows the student to think more about theory and abstract ideas in economics. Students will learn about the national debt, GDP in different countries, international economics, and an economy's growth. Microeconomics will give the students an understanding of the basic principles of economics based on what consumers and producers do as individuals in an economy. Microeconomics consists of more math concepts, for example, using the supply and demand graphs. We will look at specifics in an economy rather than the whole economy. Students will learn the basic concepts of microeconomics, different product markets and how they work, supply and demand, and the role of the government. This course counts as a History course and is staffed by the Math department.

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      A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • HIST 504 | Enlightenment and Romanticism

      Offered on a bi-annual bases. LIKELY NOT TO BE OFFERED IN 2022-23, interested rising juniors are advised to take in 2021-22.
      This semester elective is designed for students who develop an interest in intellectual history and want the opportunity to seek further depth. By reading and studying the poetry, art, and prose literature of these two movements, we hope to understand the dynamic interaction between the rationalism and optimism of 1750-1800 and the haunted, wild Romantic ideas of 1800-1850. We will also trace the legacy of these movements in the Western tradition. Students will spend most of their time evaluating and commenting on selected primary sources from Locke to Poe.


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    • HIST 551 | AP European History

      Open to qualified 11th graders and 12th graders, the AP European History elective introduces students to the cultural, intellectual, economic, social, political, and diplomatic developments of European history from 1450 to the present day. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements that shaped Europe, the goals of the AP program in European history are to develop an understanding of the principal themes in modern European history, an ability to analyze historical evidence, and an ability to express historical understanding in writing.

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    • HIST 601 | AP Comparative Government & Politics

      This year-long course prepares students for the AP Comparative Government and Politics exam. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures, policies, and challenges of six core countries: the United Kingdom, China, Mexico, Russia, Nigeria, and Iran. In addition to the democratic and authoritarian nations listed above, the course will reach to include India and North Korea - notable exceptions from the AP curriculum.

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  • SCIENCE

    • SCI 101 | Biology

      This course introduces students to essential principles of biology: cells, chemistry of life, genetics, evolutionary theory, biological diversity, and organism structure and function. Human anatomy and physiology are emphasized. Students use the framework of the scientific method to explore the living world in laboratory investigations. They are challenged to learn highly detailed material in order to gain greater appreciation for the diversity of life on earth, to understand prevailing thinking on the origin and evolution of living things, and to develop a clear sense of how Homo sapiens fit into this intricate web.

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      Students will rent the 2019 Miller & Levine Biology textbook from the school for the 2021-22 school year. The cost is $56/year. Here is the rental agreement for the textbook rental. Students will be asked to sign this agreement when they receive their text.
    • SCI 201 | Chemistry

      Though this is a demanding college preparatory course, the teachers encourage an appreciation of the role chemistry plays in our daily lives outside of the classroom. Simply stated, chemistry is the study of matter and the changes it undergoes. This course is designed to challenge students’ problem-solving skills while covering the concepts of a traditional introductory college preparatory course. Students are given the opportunity to explore the world around them through lab work, class discussions, and activities including an in-depth look at the chemistry of the food we eat and a study of the gases in our atmosphere.

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    • SCI 251 | Honors Chemistry

      This course is designed to explore the fundamental nature of matter and study its physical and chemical characteristics. Students engage in laboratory activities that reinforce the scientific method, apply knowledge to real-world applications, and integrate technology in the science classroom. The honors course differs from regular chemistry in its more strenuous mathematical component, complexity, and depth of theory studied.

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    • SCI 301 | Physics

      Physics examines four basic areas of study: mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermal energy, and modern physics. The objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to identify four unifying themes of science: scale, models (physical, mathematical, or conceptual), constancy and change, and systems.

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      No textbook required.
    • MATH/SCI 305 | STEM Robotics I

      As an introductory course in robotics the students will learn JAVA computer programming as well as problem solving strategies. This course will involve students in the development, building and programming of a Tetrix robot. Working in teams they design, build, program and document their progress. Topics include motor control, gear ratios, torque, friction, sensors, timing, program loops, logic gates, decision-making, timing sequences, propulsion systems and binary number systems. Student designed robots will be programmed to compete in a variety of autonomous and remote controlled challenges.

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      No textbook required.
    • SCI 351 | Honors Physics

      The Honors Physics course is a rigorous, math-intensive introduction to the subject. The bulk of the course is devoted to the study of mechanics, or the behavior of particles subject to systems of forces, and includes topics such as one- and two-dimensional kinematics, Newton’s Laws, momentum, mechanical energy, rotational motion, gravitation, and oscillations. During the final quarter of the year students examine a variety of modern topics, particularly electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes collaborative work and problem-solving techniques and involves frequent lab work. The course is designed to develop a solid foundation for college-level physics and to instill an appreciation for and curiosity about the complexity of the universe.

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      No textbook required.
    • SCI 401 | Environmental Science

      Students enrolled in the Environmental Science course are assumed to possess a broad background in biology and chemistry. Students are provided with experience in advanced field work, laboratory techniques, and laboratory investigation reporting techniques through activities focusing on local ecosystems. Students pursue, from both scientific and social scientific perspectives, the effect of human societies on the natural world. The course stresses students' responsibility for determining the quality of the environment and, consequently, their own lives. Sustainability principles are given special emphasis. Students are trained to identify and seek solutions to environmental problems. In addition to local environmental issues, students investigate the global trends of overpopulation, ecosystem degradation, atmospheric change, and loss of biodiversity.

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    • SCI 402 | Exercise Physiology

      In this course, students will study acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. Muscle, environmental physiology, practical physiology testing, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular function in response to exercise training will be emphasized in the classroom and applied to laboratory activities.

      Objectives: Students who successfully complete the requirements for this course will:
      • Have a foundational understanding of the complex nature of the human organism from a physiological perspective.
      • Understand the muscular and energy physiological demands from an inactive state to an active state.
      • Understand the acute physiological responses to exercise.
      • Understand the chronic physiological adaptations to exercise.
      • Have mastered basic physiological laboratory experiments and procedures.
      This is a complementary course to the Topics in Human Anatomy and Physiology course.

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      Textbooks will be assigned in class.
    • SCI 403 | Neuroscience

      In Neuroscience, students will delve into the workings of the brain and the rest of the human nervous system by considering questions such as: How do we learn? Why do we need sleep? How does our memory work? How do our nerves send and receive signals? How do we complete the picture of what we see, such that we recognize people, movement, colors, and familiar places? Though not a primarily laboratory- based course, experimental design and hands-on inquiry are part of the curriculum. Required assignments will be readings from Dr. David Eagleman's book, The Brain: The Story of You, selected articles, and a variety of informative videos by established neuroscientists. Independent learning on topics of one's preference will occur, with presentations to the class. The relationship between the nervous and hormonal systems, as well as between the nervous and muscular systems, will be considered as time allows.

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    • SCI 404 | Nutrition

      This is an introductory course in nutrition. The focus of the course will be placed on evidence based nutritional strategies to meet the nutrient and energy demands of basic life functions, physical activity, exercise and athletic performance. Scientific literature will be used to evaluate nutritional information found in the media, claims for dietary supplements and popular diets.

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    • MATH/SCI 405 | STEM Robotics II

      The STEM Robotics II course builds upon the skills students learned in STEM Robotics I. Working in teams, students will design, build, and program Tetrix robots which must complete more complex and more precise tasks with less margin for error than the projects in STEM Robotics I.

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      No textbook required.
    • SCI 501 | AP Biology

      The AP Biology course covers the entire Advanced Placement curriculum, fully preparing students for the AP exam. There is a comprehensive laboratory component to the course, which includes applications of recombinant DNA technologies and experience using modern lab techniques and equipment. The AP Biology course assists students in organizing biological concepts and topics into a coherent conceptual framework, helps students internalize and effectively utilize the processes of scientific reasoning, and helps them develop or enhance their interest in biology and gain a sense of the subject’s relevance to their everyday lives. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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    • SCI 502 | AP Environmental Science

      The goal of the Advanced Placement Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems, both natural and humanmade, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study (e.g. biology, chemistry, earth science, geography), yet there are several major unifying themes that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The course takes advantage of the environs surrounding our campus for firsthand research. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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    • SCI 503 | AP Physics C: Mechanics

      AP Physics C is a demanding college-level course that requires the use of calculus. The course emphasizes collaborative work and problem-solving techniques. The course aims at covering Mechanics (one of the two Physics C AP examinations). Instruction includes video lectures and computer applets. In class, students will engage in problem sets and labs. Labs – both virtual and real – will be done on a weekly basis. This course is designed to replace introductory college physics courses designed for physics and engineering majors.

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      No textbook required.
    • SCI 601 | AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

      AP Physics C-E&M is a second-year AP physics class that is intended to replace a college-level introductory course in electricity and magnetism. The course makes extensive use of calculus techniques in the exploration of topics such as electric fields, electric potential, capacitance, circuits, magnetic fields, and electromagnetic induction. Students are required to work well both independently and in small groups, and labs involve long-term, independent projects. Due to the sophisticated conceptual material and mathematical techniques involved, it is strongly recommended that students complete AP calculus and AP physics C-M before taking the course.

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      No textbook required.
  • MATHEMATICS

    • MATH 101 | Algebra 1

      This is a cornerstone course designed to prepare students to investigate and master more complex, but related, concepts studied over the balance of the mathematics curriculum. Students review the language of algebra, real number operations, and approaches used to solve linear equations before engaging in an expanded study of function graphing, linear analysis, methods of solving linear inequalities, and systems of both inequalities and linear equations. Multiplication of polynomials, factoring, and solving quadratic and exponential functions, together with simplification and evaluation of radical expressions, constitute the remainder of the course.

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       A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • MATH 151 | Geometry

      This course covers the fundamental concepts of geometry, with algebra and discrete mathematical topics woven into the curriculum. Topics include reasoning and proof, building blocks of geometric shapes, congruence and similarity, right triangles and trigonometry, transformations of figures and equations, and surface area and volume.

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      A TI-84 Plus calculator is required. No textbook required.
    • MATH 201 | Algebra 2

      In this course, students continue the study of concepts introduced in Algebra I and Geometry. The concept of function is introduced and families of functions are introduced as important tools to explore, analyze, and make conjectures as we further develop mathematical problem-solving skills. Using real-world examples, students explore quadratic equations, polynomials, and operations of functions. Students also examine properties, applications, and graphs of absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, power, and radical functions.

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      A TI-84 Plus calculator is required. No textbook required.
    • MATH 251 | Honors Algebra 2

      In this honors course, students continue the study of concepts introduced in Algebra I and Geometry. Concepts such as linear functions, linear regression, data analysis, matrices, and systems of equations are introduced as important tools to explore, analyze, and make conjectures as we further develop mathematical problem-solving skills. Using real-world examples, students explore quadratic equations, polynomials, and operations of functions. Students also examine properties, applications, and graphs of absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, power, radical, and trigonometric functions.

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        A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
      *Students: Please email Ms. Wolf (ewolf@holderness.org) before you buy this book; she has several copies available and would be happy to have you borrow one for the year.

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    • MATH 301 | Precalculus

      This course offers a more rigorous approach to the study of functions and to the topics needed for calculus. The emphasis of this course is on analysis through formal mathematical notation and the relation of mathematical concepts to real world scenarios. Major topics include linear, exponential, and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions; polynomials; radical functions; mathematical limits; composition of functions; and inverses of functions.

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       A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
      If you only want an electronic copy, you may access the free text here: opentextbookstore.com/precalc/
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • MATH 304 | Computer Science

      Python is an accessible programming language whose simple yet powerful structure and easy-to-use development environment allow students to achieve impressive results quickly. Using this programming language, students will learn the basics of Computer Science including variables, conditional statements (if-else), iterations (loops) and the fundamentals of programming design and implementation. We will also utilize Python’s ‘turtle graphics’ module, which allows for two-dimensional designs. Throughout the course, we will discuss the challenges and opportunities related to the explosion of computer use in the modern world.

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      No textbook required.
    • MATH/SCI 305 | STEM Robotics I

      As an introductory course in robotics the students will learn JAVA computer programming as well as problem solving strategies. This course will involve students in the development, building and programming of a Tetrix robot. Working in teams they design, build, program and document their progress. Topics include motor control, gear ratios, torque, friction, sensors, timing, program loops, logic gates, decision-making, timing sequences, propulsion systems and binary number systems. Student designed robots will be programmed to compete in a variety of autonomous and remote controlled challenges.

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      No textbook required.
    • MATH 351 | Honors Precalculus

      This course is designed for students who have completed Honors Algebra 2. Honors Precalculus covers all of the topics studied in the regular pre-calculus course; however, the pace is slightly faster than regular pre-calculus so that the students will be able to cover more trigonometry and topics that will prepare them for AP Calculus. By the end of the class the students will not only be introduced to topics that are vital to understanding Calculus, such as continuity and limits, but they will also be introduced to the derivative through the limit definition.

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       A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
      If you only want an electronic copy, you may access the free text here: opentextbookstore.com/precalc/
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • MATH 352 | Advanced Precalculus

      This course is designed for students who have done very well in Algebra II. Advanced Precalculus covers all of the topics studied in the regular pre-calculus course; however, the pace is slightly faster than regular pre-calculus so that the students will be able to cover more trigonometry and topics that will prepare them for AP Calculus. By the end of the class the students will not only be introduced to topics that are vital to understanding Calculus, such as continuity and limits, but they will also be introduced to the derivative through the limit definition.

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      Students should download the free, online version of THIS TEXT as we will supplement this resource with other materials throughout the year. A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
    • MATH 401 | Topics in Mathematics

      In this year-long course, students study mathematics in contexts and develop their abilities to problem solve, reason, and communicate. Real world situations provide the contexts for mathematical investigation. The topics include but are not limited to: logic, numeration, statistics, financial mathematics, history of mathematics, and functions.

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      A TI-84 Plus calculator is required. No textbook required.
    • MATH/SCI 405 | STEM Robotics II

      The STEM Robotics II course builds upon the skills students learned in STEM Robotics I. Working in teams, students will design, build, and program Tetrix robots which must complete more complex and more precise tasks with less margin for error than the projects in STEM Robotics I.

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      No textbook required.
    • MATH 421 | Calculus

      Calculus begins with a thorough review of standard high school mathematics in preparation for Calculus and the SAT. The class is designed to introduce students to important Calculus topics and to prepare them for college Calculus. The course will cover the conceptual basis of Calculus including the limit definition of the derivative and Riemann Sums. It will also cover in great detail the rules for differentiation and introduce the integral. By the end of the class students will be exposed to the applications of Calculus with Related Rate and Optimization problems.

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       A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • MATH 501 | AP Calculus AB

      AP Calculus is primarily concerned with developing a student’s understanding of the concepts of calculus through the use of the unifying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • MATH 502 | AP Statistics

      This is the high school equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college statistics course. In this course, students develop strategies for collecting, organizing, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data, with a focus on univariate and bivariate data. Simulations and probability aid students in constructing models for chance phenomena and lead to the study of inference, where students learn to complete confidence intervals and hypotheses tests. Students use technology, such as the Ti calculator, Fathom, and online applets, to strengthen their understanding of statistical concepts. Throughout the year, students apply statistical skills learned in class to analyze data from a variety of sources, including data from our athletic teams, student-generated data, and online sources. The coursework culminate with AP exam in May.

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      A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • MATH 503 | AP Computer Science

      This year-long course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data(algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. The course is designed For 11th and 1 zth grade students who have completed Algebra 2 with a grade of B or higher.

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      A TI-84 Plus calculator is required. No textbook required.
    • HIST 503| AP Economics

      A year-long course which is broken into two parts AP Macroeconomics in the first semester and AP Microeconomics in the second semester. Macroeconomics will give students an understanding of the economy as a whole. Students will look at what is happening at a national level. This course allows the student to think more about theory and abstract ideas in economics. Students will learn about the national debt, GDP in different countries, international economics, and an economy's growth. Microeconomics will give the students an understanding of the basic principles of economics based on what consumers and producers do as individuals in an economy. Microeconomics consists of more math concepts, for example, using the supply and demand graphs. We will look at specifics in an economy rather than the whole economy. Students will learn the basic concepts of microeconomics, different product markets and how they work, supply and demand, and the role of the government. This course counts as a History course and is staffed by the Math department.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • MATH 551 | AP Calculus BC (semester)

      AP Calculus BC is a semester course designed for students who have completed AP Calculus AB. The course is a continuation of Calculus AB and emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The course will cover advanced integration, differential equations, sequences and series, (including Taylor Series and Maclaurin Series), polar functions, and parametric functions. Students are expected to take the AP Calculus BC exam in May.

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       A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • MATH 552 | AP Calculus BC (full-year)

      Pre-requisite: Advanced Precalculus at Holderness or permission by the department chair. AP Calculus is primarily concerned with developing a student’s understanding of the concepts of calculus through the use of the unifying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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       Please also have a TI-84 Plus calculator.
      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • MATH 601 | Differential Equations

      Differential Equations is a semester-long course for students who have completed AP Calculus AB and/or BC. Students will study ways to solve differential equations graphically, numerically, and algebraically. Students will also study the real world applications of these types of equations.

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  • MODERN & CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

    • LANG 101 | French 1

      The goals of the first two years of French are to develop concurrently the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose the student to the culture of the francophonic world. At the more advanced levels, the department emphasizes the development of reading and writing skills through the study of literature and current cultural texts, while continuing to provide grammar review. An Advanced Placement course is offered to qualified students with the permission of the department and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-68005-799-7 (2019 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2019 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning. 
    • LANG 201 | French 2

      The goals of the first two years of French are to develop concurrently the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose the student to the culture of the francophonic world. At the more advanced levels, the department emphasizes the development of reading and writing skills through the study of literature and current cultural texts, while continuing to provide grammar review. An Advanced Placement course is offered to qualified students with the permission of the department and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-68005-821-5 (2019 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2019 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.  
    • LANG 301 | French 3

      French 3 is an intermediate course in French language and culture, bridging the levels of beginning language to advanced study. During the year, students continue their study of French grammar and become more proficient at interpreting, reading, speaking and writing directly in the language. Students also continue their study of French and francophone cultures around the world.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-68005-843-7 (2019 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2019 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.
    • LANG 401 | French 4

      French 4 continues the study of French language and serves as the preparatory year for Advanced Placement French Language and Culture. Students develop greater proficiency in the details of French language through the study of advanced grammar, readings, discussion, and composition. The goals of the course are to develop the ability to discuss one's ideas coherently and logically in spoken and written French and to deepen one's knowledge and understanding of French civilization and francophone culture through readings in French and francophone literature.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-54332-007-7 *
      *Note: we have secured special pricing for the Face-à-Face book. Click on the book above and you will be asked to create a Vista Higher Learning account. After you make an account, you should automatically be brought to the page to buy the book at the discounted price. 
    • LANG 501 | AP French Language and Culture

      The AP French Language and Culture course emphasizes continued language acquisition, communication skills, and cultural knowledge and understanding. The course will be conducted exclusively in French, and students will practice on a daily basis their interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication and expression. The course organizes the study of literature, current events, and cultural topics under the umbrella of the six College Board designated themes: Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Global Challenges, Aesthetics and Beauty, Family and Communities, and Private and Public Identities. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-68004-034-0 *
      *Note: Click on the book above and you will be asked to create a Vista Higher Learning account. After you make an account, you should automatically be brought to the page to buy the book. 
    • LANG 102 | Mandarin Chinese 1

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • LANG 202 | Mandarin Chinese 2

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • LANG 302 | Mandarin Chinese 3

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • LANG 402 | Mandarin Chinese 4

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

      Order Your Textbook(s)

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • LANG 502 | Mandarin Chinese 5

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book(s) for class.
    • LANG 103 | Spanish 1

      The aim of the first two years of Spanish is to help students achieve a mastery of basic written and spoken language, and to introduce Spanish and Hispanic history and culture. The Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 courses stress vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Students and teachers use internet sources alongside the textbook to engage with real-life situations, current events and to look at the cultural differences and similarities between what we study and the students' own experiences.

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       ISBN #: 978-1-68004-519-2 (2017 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2017 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning. 
       
      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook (2017 edition) from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-68004-491-1.
       
      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Third Edition, 2017).
    • LANG 203 | Spanish 2

      The aim of the first two years of Spanish is to help students achieve a mastery of basic written and spoken language, and to introduce Spanish and Hispanic history and culture. The Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 courses stress vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Students and teachers use internet sources alongside the textbook to engage with real-life situations, current events and to look at the cultural differences and similarities between what we study and the students' own experiences.

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      ISBN #: 978-1-68004-664-9

      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2017 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning. 
       
      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook (2017 edition) from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-68004-637-3.
       
      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Third Edition, 2017).
    • LANG 303 | Spanish 3

      In the third and fourth years, students continue to expand their working vocabularies and grammatical understanding, and focus on writing and speaking with fluidity and idiomatic language. Students will study not only literary selections in Spanish, but will also use current events, pop culture, art and historical events to practice the language and increase their cultural understanding of the many Spanish-speaking regions of the world. These courses are conducted almost exclusively in Spanish.
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      ISBN#: 978-1-68004-715-8
      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2017 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning. 

      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook (2017 edition) from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-68004-689-2.

      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Third Edition, 2017).
    • LANG 403 | Spanish 4

      In the third and fourth years, students continue to expand their working vocabularies and grammatical understanding, and focus on writing and speaking with fluidity and idiomatic language. Students will study not only literary selections in Spanish, but will also use current events, pop culture, art and historical events to practice the language and increase their cultural understanding of the many Spanish-speaking regions of the world. These courses are conducted almost exclusively in Spanish.

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      A novel (TBD); and

      ISBN#: 978-1-68005-700-3 (2019 edition)

      Note: Students will need both the Imagina textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the Imagina book pictured above to purchase the textbook (2019 edition) and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.

      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook (2019 edition) from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-68005-683-9.

      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Fourth Edition, 2019).
    • LANG 503 | AP Spanish Language

      The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes continued language acquisition, communication skills, and cultural knowledge and understanding. The course will be conducted exclusively in Spanish, and students will practice on a daily basis their interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication and expression. The course organizes the study of literature, current events, and cultural topics under the umbrella of the six College Board designated themes: Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Global Challenges, Aesthetics and Beauty, Family and Communities, and Private and Public Identities. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

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      Note: Students only need to purchase access to the Worktext Supersite Plus Code - click the image above and then click the "Codes & Other Materials" tab: ISBN: 978-1-5433-452-7. Students DO NOT need a copy of the paperback book.

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • LANG 603 | AP Spanish Literature

      The AP Spanish Literature and Culture course is a survey of Spanish and Hispanic literary works ranging from the 13th century to the 21st century. Students read and analyze poetry, prose, essays and theater pieces from several time periods, including such notable works as Cervantes' El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (excerpts), Lorca's La casa de Bernarda Alba, and poetry by Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Students refine their analytical writing skills through comparative essays and shorter, interpretive pieces. Much of the class time is spent discussing the readings; students thus hone their speaking skills as well. The class is conducted exclusively in Spanish. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

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      If you purchase a used textbook, make sure there is no writing in it.

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
  • THEOLOGY & RELIGIOUS STUDIES

    • THEO 201 | World Religions

      The one-semester World Religions course cultivates students' cultural and analytical reasoning, expands their capacities for empathy and creative imagination, develops their reflective and moral sensibilities, and builds foundational knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • THEO 401 | Ethics

      This course introduces students to a variety of ethical strategies from both philosophical and theological sources. Students investigate the theoretical underpinnings and the practical applications of ethical systems through case studies, class discussion, and debate. Students will reflect on their own communities of formation and explore and develop their own tools for moral reasoning. The course culminates with independent research on a pressing moral problem of the student's choosing. Students will present the case to the class, solicit peer review, and write a final position paper that demonstrates the learning goals of research, logical thinking, and effective argumentation.

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    • ENG/THEO 403 | Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature

      Do you have a Bible on your shelf somewhere but you’ve never really read it? Did you know the Bible is more of a library than a book? Are the readings in chapel a total mystery to you? Have you ever encountered a biblical reference in another book and wished you knew more? Are you or a loved one named after a figure in the Bible but know little about the namesake? Do you ever wonder how and why the Bible animates historical and contemporary political speech and action? Do you ever wonder what are some of the biblical sources that undergird Western theories of law and justice? Do you appreciate great writing? Do you wish someday to be able to call yourself well-read?

      The Bible as Literature is an upper-level semester course which provides an additional choice for students seeking to satisfy the graduation requirement in Theology & Religious Studies.  Cross-listed with the English dept, the course is listed as ENG on the transcript.

      METHOD: The course provides an introduction to the Judeo-Christian canon of biblical texts as works of sacred literature and rhetoric.  Students will explore the range of biblical genres through a survey of its historical, prophetic, poetic, sophistic, liturgical, gospel, and apocalyptic literatures.  With analysis of character, plot, form, literary devices, and redaction, they will learn to decipher and defend their own interpretive and rhetorical choices as biblical readers.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • PERFORMING ARTS

      • ART 101 | Experimental Music

        Introductory course
        This course is an introduction to music performance, composition, and appreciation. Students will be introduced to the work of prominent experimental musicians and explore their creative methods. Fundamental musical concepts will be explored including: perceptions of time, harmony and the harmonic series, melody as spoken language, naturally occurring and man made form in music (ambient music vs. popular song forms), etc. Concepts will be incorporated during lab style creative projects, where discoveries are documented and shared as part of the peer learning process. Improvisation and various styles of notation are part of experiencing musical concepts. This is an ideal environment to begin creating music or continue a musical practice.

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        Coming soon.
      • ART 104 | Intro to Acting

        Introductory course
        This course offers students the opportunity to study the fundamentals of Acting utilizing the Sanford Meisner method of “repeat” exercises, learning to work moment to moment, listening and response, and, most importantly, how to put one’s attention on the other person to be truthful in an imaginary situation. As the semester progresses, students will advance from short impulse dialogues to scripts from a variety of genres written for both stage and film. There also will be an improvisation and monologue component of the class which will include some basic work in creating original theater. It will be fun; it will be physical, and students will learn a vocabulary for how to discuss the art and craft of acting.

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        No textbook required.
      • ART 201 | A Capella

        1. A Capella will be working on a variety of pieces written for mixed voice group singing, with the opportunity for solo and group work. The aim of each semester will be to expose students to the extensive world of A Capella. They will perform a concert each semester, with many other performance opportunities including chapel, assembly, and competing at the International Competition of High School Acapella (ICHSA.) The course will especially appeal to students who are interested in furthering their knowledge and abilities in singing and general musical knowledge.

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          No textbook required.
      • ART 202 | Band

        1. Students will play a variety of genres of music based on the abilities and instruments provided in the group as it varies year to year. The aim of each semester will be to expose students to a breadth of music, work on playing as an ensemble, solo/improvisation work, basic music comprehension and putting on a concert. The ensemble performs throughout the year at many school events and will have access to use of the ProTool’s recording studio.
        2. Prior individual instruction is required for enrollment in the course; This instruction does not need to have been taken at Holderness.

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        No textbook required.
      • ART 204 | Movement as Exercise and Art

        Introductory course
        This active and multi-faceted course considers the realm of physical movement as a vehicle for communication in art and in life. Beginning with the proper way to stretch safely, center oneself, and increase balance and strength, students will explore how movement, as a theatrical activity, is used to demonstrate an idea, elicit a response, define a piece of music or visual art, or express a theatrical text such as Samuel Beckett’s short play--Act Without Words. All students will learn to perform accessible and fun combinations, and those who wish to work in a more specifically defined modern dance-theater study will have the opportunity to train technically and engage in projects which offer that type of choreography. Performed works this year will include the fusion of different types of stage and dance movement in pieces such as Searching for the Heart of Saturday Night which is an imagined live scene of Edward Hopper’s famous painting, Nighthawks at the Diner to the music of Tom Waits, a class ensemble work titled Walking By Flashlight to the jazz composition of the Maria Schneider Orchestra by the same name, an inquiry into Pop and Blues, or perhaps a pre winter-break work called-- Solstice. All students also will have the opportunity to work in small groups to create short movement patterns of their own through prompts of music, photography, 2D art, sculpture, video, or scenes of non-verbal communication. Dance expertise is not required—just a willingness to branch out of your comfort zone and explore how the human body can utilize movement as a form of theater.

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        Coming soon.
      • ART 303 | Music Production

        Description coming soon.

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        No textbook required.
      • ART 304 | Live Mic—Storytelling, Spoken Word, and Slam!

        Introductory course
        This class explores all the components in finding your voice to tell a story through various styles and methods of articulation including a Moth Radio Hour inspired approach to Storytelling, Spoken Word Poetry, and the more metered and energetic genre of Slam. Students are trained in all of these styles and will have the opportunity to perform in one area of choice by the end of the semester. The focus in this class in on process, honest and polished articulation, and learning the difference between successfully telling a story that is not written as a set text, and performing a more specifically constructed work of Spoken Word or Slam. This is a celebration of the oral tradition in humanity. Everyone has a story; what’s yours?

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        Coming soon.
      • ART 403 | Contemporary Performance Ensemble

        Advanced course
        The Contemporary Performance Ensemble is a collective of advanced instrumentalists and vocalists focused on performing and recording the music of living artists. Projects include off campus performances and collaborations with professionals, as well as regular features at school events. Students are encouraged to develop original work and share it with the ensemble during monthly studio classes. This is a supportive and challenging course ideal for students interested in continuing their musical growth beyond high school.

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        Coming soon.
  • VISUAL ARTS

    • ART 106 | Studio Practices I

      1. Student artists in the Studio Practices course will experiment with a variety of media to create visual art during the semester long course. The elements of art (line, shape, space, color, value, texture, and form) are applied in two-dimensional Drawing, Painting and Design lessons. Students will begin to apply the principles of design, (rhythm/ movement, balance, proportion/ scale, variety/ unity, emphasis, contrast and repetition) in their art expression. The development and application of artistic techniques and skills are emphasized.
      2. Students will express their ideas by using art as a form of communication and will develop the confidence and ability to evaluate and discuss their own work and the work of others. As students work toward an appreciation and understanding of art, they will relate visual arts to various historical and cultural traditions. Students will learn to respect their own ideas and artistic expressions and those of others as they analyze and evaluate works of art.
      3. Students will develop Final Portfolios that will be assessed after each lesson and at the end of the semester with the guidance of specific grading rubrics and group critiques.

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      No textbook required.
    • ART 107 | 2D Digital Design

      1. This semester long course is a hands-on digital art & design course with strong emphasis on graphic communication. Students will develop their creative process through brainstorming and sketching, explore design principles and elements, and practice digital image manipulation. Assignments include: personal branding, logo, business card & letterhead design. Depending on student interest, potential projects include infographic, package, sticker, poster, album, and t-shirt design.
      2. Students will use Adobe Illustrator Creative Cloud to develop vector images. Other technology and software may be used following the interests and needs of students.
      3. The goals of this course are for students to develop their creative process, learn and practice the foundations of design, discover how design permeates other areas of study, and explore potential career paths. In addition, students will engage in active observation and conversation about work produced by themselves and by their classmates, as well as visual references to historical and contemporary design.

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      No textbook required.
    • ART 108 | 3D Foundations

      Introductory course
      Student artists in the 3D Foundations course will experiment with a variety of media to create visual art during this semester long course. The elements of art (line, shape, form, space, color, value, and texture) are applied in two and three-dimensional design lessons. Students will apply the principles of design, (movement, balance, proportion/ scale, variety, unity, emphasis, contrast, figure/ground relationships and rhythm/ repetition) with their artistic expression. The development and application of artistic techniques and skills are emphasized. Students will express their ideas by using art as a form of communication.

      A wide range of mediums are used in this course including, but not limited to pencils, paper, cardboard, wire, clay, found materials and mixed media. Students will develop the confidence and ability to evaluate and discuss their own work and the work of others. As students work toward an appreciation and understanding of art, they will relate visual arts to various historical and cultural traditions. Students will learn to respect their own ideas and artistic expressions and those of others as they analyze and evaluate works of art. Students will develop ePortfolios that will be assessed after each lesson and at the end of the semester.
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      No textbook required.
    • ART 109 | Photography I

      1. Photography I will establish a solid photographic foundation in a hands-on teaching environment by introducing students to the magic and craft of digital photography. Students will learn basic photographic techniques using professional digital cameras in manual exposure mode. They will be tasked with slowing down and becoming proficient in aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings in various lighting situations. Students will work individually as well as collaboratively in groups while discussing the photographic merits of particular places and shooting at different times of day.
      2. Students will learn how to see and recognize the quality of light, color and tone when making photographs as well as how to compose an image, and how capture a photographic moment. They will also be introduced to studio lighting, Adobe Photoshop and learn how to print professional quality photographs.
      3. Students will take part in meaningful group discussions and critiques of their work. They will learn how to give and accept constructive criticism of their and their classmates’ photographs while working on assignments and a small personal project. Students will also experience the analog traditional darkroom and make their own pin-hole cameras.
      4. In short, students will learn diverse photographic techniques with an emphasis on how to see and create meaningful and powerful photographs they can be proud of.

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      Media Literacy Required Reading: Students will be required to regularly read one of several mainstream news outlets, such as the New York Times or the Wall Street Journal for class discussions about news and culture.
    • ART 110 | Filmmaking I

      1. Students will be introduced to the technical and fundamental skills needed to create short films using digital video cameras and Adobe Premiere Pro. They will study conceptual aspects of narrative storytelling in documentary and fiction. The class will emphasize creativity, personal vision and collaboration. We will view many films and scenes from various genres as creative examples for both technique and inspiration. Students will be challenged to consider the images and videos we make and view in order to improve visual literacy in the fast-paced visual culture we live in. The course will involve hands-on training while working towards a final project.
      2. During the course each student will be taught:
        · How to tell a story through video
        · The basic principles of how to capture video and audio
        · How to edit video and audio

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      No textbook required.
    • ART 206 | Studio Practices II

      1. This advanced course is a study of the principles and elements of art using a variety of studio media to explore compositional possibilities on a two-dimensional surface or three-dimensional space. The elements of design are like a palette of possibilities that artists use to express themselves. The principles of design help guide artists in making decisions about how to organize the elements on a picture plane or in physical space in order to communicate content. In order to think critically about visual design, this course will begin with a practical approach to solving visual problems while introducing the vocabulary of visual terms and visual analysis.
      2. Through structured studio experiences, students will learn the intrinsic qualities of various media and develop an understanding of compositional strategies, technical skills and design processes. The importance of good craftsmanship and a professional approach to studio practices will be emphasized along with the experimental and imaginative manipulation of form and content. Increasing emphasis will be placed on subjectivity, content and conceptual development in student work.
      3. Students will develop Final Portfolios that will be assessed after each lesson and at the end of the semester with the guidance of specific grading rubrics and group critiques.

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      No textbook required.
    • ART 208 | Ceramics II

      1. These semester courses are open to all students who have completed the prerequisite ceramics course. Classes are tailored to each student, focusing on individual interests. Ceramics students are expected to increase their technical proficiency, explore a diversity of forms, and employ a variety of glazing techniques.
      2. Students learn terms and definitions in order to become more familiar with the technical aspects of ceramics. They are introduced to a number of resources in the library, and see videos of famous ceramic artists.

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      No textbook required.
    • ART 209 | Photography II

      1. Photography II begins where Photography I left off. Students will continue using professional digital cameras and learn additional Adobe Photoshop techniques. Emphasis will be placed on further developing talent, artistic expression and documentary communication in a hands-on environment. Students will be exposed to modern and contemporary photography and will study the work of influential photographers. We will often work together shooting as a group while discussing the photographic merits of particular places, quality of light and shooting at different times of day. Students will also have access to professional lighting equipment they can use in the studio as well as out on location.
      2. Students will also take part in meaningful group critiques of their work and consider standards and ethics in art and documentary practice. The class will have an emphasis on creativity and diverse interpretation of assignments as well as a personal project of the students’ choosing.
      3. The class will also look at photography that illustrates diverse cultures at home and abroad as well as photography that takes an activist approach. Students will learn how to present photographs in murals, print portfolio, on the web and mounted on a wall.

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      Media Literacy Required Reading: Students will be required to regularly read one of several mainstream news outlets, such as the New York Times or the Wall Street Journal for class discussions about news and culture.
    • ART 210 | Filmmaking II

      1. Students will continue their filmmaking education with an emphasis on narrative storytelling and self-expression in documentary and fiction. Students will work to develop their personal vision in a hands-on creative environment individually as well as collaboratively in groups. Craft and creating compelling films with emotional impact are of principal importance in this class. Students will shoot with professional grade DSLR cameras and audio equipment as they fulfill creative, enjoyably and gratifying assignments while working towards a final project. Students enrolled in this course will gain more experience with writing screenplays and creating storyboards for film projects. We will also view films and regularly have constructive group discussions and critiques. Filmmaking I, or equivalent, is required to sign-up for this course.
      2. During the course each student will be taught:
        · How to tell an impactful and emotive story
        · Expand their knowledge of composition and lighting
        · Further develop their editing techniques in Adobe Premier Pro

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      No textbook required.
    • ART 308 | Ceramics III

      1. These semester courses are open to all students who have completed the prerequisite ceramics course. Classes are tailored to each student, focusing on individual interests. Ceramics students are expected to increase their technical proficiency, explore a diversity of forms, and employ a variety of glazing techniques.
      2. Students learn terms and definitions in order to become more familiar with the technical aspects of ceramics. They are introduced to a number of resources in the library, and see videos of famous ceramic artists.

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      No textbook required.
    • ART 309 | Photography III

      1. Photography III is for advanced photographers who wish to immerse themselves further into photographic practice. The curriculum is geared towards a student’s interest: whether it be abstraction, portraiture, documentary, landscape, digital or traditional film and darkroom techniques. Emphasis is placed on creating personal work and spending time deeply involved in longer-term projects using photography to create a series of images that work together.
      2. Students will regularly view classic and contemporary photography and take part in group discussions and critiques. They will be required to present their long-term project(s) in either book form, murals, alternative techniques, print portfolio, on the web or mounted on a wall.

      Order Your Textbook(s)

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • ART 310 | Filmmaking III

      Advanced course
      The course is designed for more advanced filmmakers who wish to immerse themselves further in the medium of film and cinema. The curriculum is geared towards students’ interest; whether it be narrative fiction or documentary. Strong emphasis is placed on creating personal work, exploration of a theme and spending time deeply involved in a long-term film project in an experiential learning environment.

      Students will regularly share their work as it is in progress, view films and film scenes and be expected to participate in group discussions and critiques. They will be required to present their long-term film project(s) at the end of the semester.
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      No textbook required.
    • ART 506 | AP Art & Design

      AP Studio Art provides the opportunity for the visually inclined students to excel and receive recognition on a national level. It allows students to compare their work with other high school students throughout the nation, and helps them prepare an excellent portfolio for study at the college level. All students enrolling in the course are expected to submit an AP Portfolio.

      AP Studio Art: Drawing/ 2D/ 3D is a two-semester course that focuses on producing a large number of quality works that demonstrate mastery of fundamental artistic concepts. In their work, students will investigate all three components of the AP Portfolio; Quality, Concentration and Breadth. Students will further develop their technical skills and creative thought processes as they find their own way to communicate visually. Students will also be presented with problems that require unconventional and imaginative solutions. This fast paced course requires the student to be highly motivated and interested in the serious study of art, which may lead to college credit. Motivation, imagination and commitment are required to succeed in the course.

      There are three portfolio types in AP Studio Art. A Drawing Portfolio, a 2D Portfolio and a 3D portfolio. Descriptions for each to follow.

      The AP Drawing Portfolio is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth are drawing issues that can be addressed through a variety of means, which could include painting, printmaking, mixed media, etc. Abstract, observational, and inventive works may demonstrate drawing competence. The range of marks used to make drawings, the arrangement of those marks, and the materials used to make the marks are endless. Projects will be structured around the elements of art and principles of design. In these projects, students will need to use their knowledge of technique and materials to communicate through their art. This encourages students to use critical thinking skills, while also developing their own voices as visual artists. Thus, students will develop mastery in concept, composition, and execution of their personal artistic vision.

      The purpose of AP Studio Art: 2-D Design is to provide an intensive study of the process of creating two-dimensional design (2-D) artwork using both traditional fine and digital art media (materials and tools). Emphasis is placed on the quality, breadth and concentration of the student’s production and experiences in digital art, photography, drawing, and design. Projects will be structured around the elements of art and principles of design. In these projects, students will need to use their knowledge of technique and materials to communicate through their art. This encourages students to use critical thinking skills, while also developing their own voices as visual artists. Thus, students will develop mastery in concept, composition, and execution of their personal artistic vision.

      The purpose of AP Studio Art: 3-D Design is to provide an intensive study of the process of creating three-dimensional (3-D) artwork using the elements and principles of design in an integrative way. Emphasis is placed on the quality, breadth and concentration of the student’s understanding of design principles relating to Space and Depth. In these projects, students will need to use their knowledge of technique and materials to communicate through their art. This encourages students to use critical thinking skills, while also developing their own voices as visual artists. Thus, students will develop mastery in concept, construction, and presentation of their personal artistic vision.
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      No textbook required.
  • OTHER COURSES

    • HEALTH 201 | Human Development

      Human Development is a quarter-long course covering topics such as human sexuality,reproductive anatomy, gender roles and identity, sexual orientation, birth control, and teen pregnancy. In addition to the human sexuality component, the course discusses the dangers of drug and alcohol use. Human Development is a pass/fail course.

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      No textbook required.
    • CAPSTONE 501 | Senior Thesis

      Senior Thesis is an experiential educational opportunity designed to provide seniors with the platform to develop their intellectual curiosity while researching and delving into the exploration of a topic of their choosing. While the essential question they create is central, it is the educational journey the students take to address that question which is most important. Included in that experience are the following components of Senior Thesis:

      Researching and annotating
      Communicating with mentors
      Interviewing experts
      Writing a literature review
      Planning and completing a March Experience
      Presenting to the community

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      No textbook required.
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 9

    Subject Course
    English English 9: Humanities
    Foreign Language French 1 or French 2
    Mandarin Chinese 1 or Mandarin Chinese 2
    Spanish 1 or Spanish 2
    History Foundations of Modern Society (required semester course)
    Science Biology
    Mathematics Algebra 1
    Geometry
    Algebra 2 (for students who have successfully completed Algebra 1 and Geometry)
    Visual & Performing Arts Introductory art course (check out our guide for this year's offering):
      • Studio Practices I
      • Intro to Acting
      • Movement as Exercise and Art
      • Live Mic-Storytelling, Spoken Word & Slam! 
      • Experimental Music
      • 3D Foundations (completion of Studio Practices recommended)
      • Photography I (completion of Studio Practices recommended)
      • Filmmaking I (completion of Studio Practices recommended)
      • Band (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
      • A Capella (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)

  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 10

    Students are required to take five courses each semester, plus Human Development for one quarter. Students may propose to take more or fewer classes by writing a formal proposal to the Academic Committee.
    Subject Course
    English English 10: Global Literatures
    Foreign Language French 2 or French 3
    Mandarin Chinese 2 or Mandarin Chinese 3
    Spanish 2 or Spanish 3
    History US History 1 (semester course) and US History 2 Seminar (semester course); or
    Advanced History of the West (for qualified 10th and 11th graders)
    Science Biology
    Chemistry (for students who have successfully completed Biology)
    Honors Chemistry (for students who are very strong in math and science)
    Mathematics Geometry
    Algebra 2 (for students who have successfully completed Geometry)
    Honors Algebra 2 (for students who are very strong in math)
    Precalculus or Honors Precalculus (for students who are very strong in math)
    Theology & Religious Studies World Religions (semester course)
    Human Development Human Development (required quarter course)
    Semester Course Electives in Visual & Performing Arts Studio Practices I
    Studio Practices II (for students who have successfully completed Studio Practices I)
    2D Digital Design
    3D Foundations
    Ceramics II (for students who have successfully completed 3D Foundations)
    Photography I
    Photography II (for students who have successfully completed Photography I)
    Filmmaking I
    Filmmaking II (for students who have successfully completed Filmmaking I)
    Experimental Music
    Music Production
    Intro to Acting
    Live Mic—Storytelling, Spoken Word and Slam!
    Movement as Exercise and Art
    Band (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
    A Capella (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
    *Please see our AP requirements
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 11

    Students are required to take five courses each semester. Students may propose to take more or fewer classes by writing a formal proposal to the Academic Committee.
    Subject Course
    English Advanced English Seminars
    AP Language & Composition*
    AP Literature*
    Foreign Language French 3, French 4 or AP French Language and Culture*
    Mandarin Chinese 3, Mandarin Chinese 4, or Mandarin Chinese 5
    Spanish 3, Spanish 4, AP Spanish Language or AP Spanish Literature*
    History AP US/AP European History: Advanced History of the West* (for qualified 10th and 11th graders)
    AP Comparative Government & Politics*
    AP European History*
    Ancient Greece (semester course)
    Enlightenment and Romanticism (semester course)
    Intro to Philosophy (semester course)
    Psychology 1 (semester course)
    Psychology 2 (semester course)
    The Modern Middle East (semester course)
    Science Chemistry
    Honors Chemistry
    Physics (for students who are at the pre-calculus level or above)
    Honors Physics (for students who are at the pre-calculus level or above)
    AP Physics C: Mechanics* (for students who have successfully completed Physics and AP Calculus)
    AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism* (for students who have successfully completed AP Physics C: Mechanics)
    Environmental Science (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Biology* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Environmental Science* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Exercise Physiology (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Neuroscience (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Nutrition (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    STEM: Robotics I (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Mathematics Algebra 2 (for students who have successfully completed Geometry)
    Precalculus (for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    Honors Precalculus or Advanced Precalculus (for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2 and seek a fast-paced course in preparation for AP Calculus)
    Calculus (for students who have successfully completed Precalculus)
    AP Calculus AB*
    AP Calculus BC (semester)*
    AP Calculus BC (full-year)*
    Differential Equations
    Topic in Mathematics (for students who have successfully completed Algebra 2)
    Computer Science (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    AP Computer Science*
    AP Economics*
    AP Statistics* 
    STEM: Robotics I (semester course)
    Visual & Performing Arts All courses are available to 11th grade students
    Theology & Religious Studies Ethics (semester course)
    Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature (semester course)
    *Please see our AP requirements
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 12

    Students are required to take five courses each semester. Students may propose to take more or fewer classes by writing a formal proposal to the Academic Committee.
    Subject Course
    English Advanced English Seminars
    AP Language & Composition*
    AP Literature*
    Foreign Language French 4 or AP French Language and Culture*
    Mandarin Chinese 3, Mandarin Chinese 4 or Mandarin Chinese 5
    Spanish 4, AP Spanish Language* or AP Spanish Literature*
    History AP Comparative Government & Politics*
    AP European History*
    Ancient Greece (semester course)
    Enlightenment and Romanticism (semester course)
    Intro to Philosophy (semester course)
    Psychology 1 (semester course)
    Psychology 2 (semester course)
    The Modern Middle East (semester course)
    Science Chemistry
    Honors Chemistry (recommended only for students who are very strong in math & science)
    Physics or Honors Physics (recommended for students who are at a Precalculus level of math or above)
    AP Biology* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Environmental Science or AP Environmental Science* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Physics C Mechanics* (open to qualified 11th and 12th grade students; must have successfully completed Physics and AP Calculus)
    AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism (open to students who have completed the AP Physics C: Mechanics course)
    Exercise Physiology (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Neuroscience (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Nutrition (semester course)
    STEM: Robotics I or Stem Robotics II (semester course—must have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Mathematics Precalculus, Honors Precalculus or Advanced Precalculus (for students who have successfully completed Algebra 2 and Geometry)
    Topic in Mathematics (must have successfully completed Algebra 2)
    Calculus (must have successfully completed Precalculus)
    AP Calculus AB*
    AP Calculus BC (semester)*
    AP Calculus BC (full-year)*
    Differential Equations
    AP Statistics*
    Computer Science (semester course)
    AP Computer Science* (must have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    AP Economics
    STEM Robotics I or Stem Robotics II (semester course)
    Visual & Performing Arts All courses are available to 12th grade students
    Theology & Religious Studies Ethics (semester course)
    Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature (semester course)
    Senior Thesis Required year-long course
    *Please see our AP requirements
Holderness School
33 Chapel Lane, Holderness, NH 03245

MAIL P.O. Box 1879 Plymouth, NH 03264-1879
PHONE (603) 536-1257
EMAIL info@holderness.org