Welcome to our online Curriculum and Registration Guide!

Make sure to read the 2019-20 Letter from the Dean of Academic Affairs and then please use the resources below to better understand the offerings and requirements of our academic program.

Course Requirements

Subject AreaRequirement
English Four years
Foreign Language Two consecutive years of the same language
History Two years, including Foundations of Modern Society and US History
Science Two years, including one year of life science and one year of physical science
Mathematics Three years, including Geometry and Algebra II
Fine Arts Two semesters
Human Development One quarter; required only for 10th graders (students who enroll after 10th grade are exempt)
Theology & Religious Studies One semester
Senior Thesis Full Year, Half Credit

Students are required to take five full-credit courses during any year or term. This requirement applies to all students in all years, even when students have repeated a year of high school. A course in the Fine Arts counts as a full credit course, with the exception of A Capella or Band, which may be taken as a sixth course. Human Development is also taken as a sixth course. Students who feel that the five-course load is too burdensome during any particular term must submit their request to the Academic Committee to carry a four-course load for that term. Requests will be considered only for students in extreme circumstances.

Interested in Advanced Placement classes?
Please see our AP Requirements here.

Students considering application to selective colleges should plan to take:
  • Three or more years of the same foreign language
  • Four years of math
  • Three or four years of science, including Chemistry and Physics

Course Offerings/Descriptions

Click on each department/course name to expand the description.
  • ENGLISH

    • English 9: Humanities

    • English 10: Global Literatures

      1. This course presents literary study through global social and cultural contexts.
      2. Students think deeply and write frequently about questions concerning their own identities in relation to social identifiers such as race, gender, ethnicity, nationality, sexual identity, religious belief, class, and privilege.
      3. Writing and other assignments link literary study with artistic expression, connecting the course with their March Artward Bound Experience.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      If you are in Ms. Barton's section, please purchase the following texts:


      If you are in Ms. Dahl's section, please purchase the following texts:


      If you are in Mr. Kendall's section, please purchase the following texts:

      During the school year, students in Mr. Kendall's section will then choose an additional book. The following are possible options. Please do not purchase any of these at this time.

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • AP Language & Composition

      The course aims to further student understanding and appreciation of the English language, particularly language used to argue and persuade. The class will study the logic of English usage, learn new words, and read writing that exemplifies precision and rhetorical force. In the first semester, content and assignments in the course will center on understanding and clarifying personal values, and weighing these against accepted societal values. The second semester will explore specific means of persuasion employed in American society. Articulate, deliberate, precise language will be encouraged and reinforced in writing assignments, oral reports, and class discussions.

      Our curriculum is designed with two factors in mind. First, it is intended to further the language development fostered in earlier grades of our school’s English curriculum and prepare students (those juniors enrolled in the class) for their final year of secondary school. Second, it capitalizes on the specific goals of the Advanced Placement curriculum. The demands of the AP program divergent from our school’s traditional curriculum—among them the focus of specific rhetorical techniques and language and the development of image analysis skills—require our enrolled students to be especially dedicated and diligent.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • AP Literature

      AP Literature and Composition focuses on the study of language used for artistic purposes. Students develop their analytical skills by reading poetry, novels, short stories, and plays. In addition to teaching students to appreciate the skillful use of rich, complex, evocative language, the class aims at developing students’ writing skills. Most of the writing in AP literature is analytic in nature, although some time is devoted to the college essay in September. The course is open to 12th graders and culminates in the taking of the Advanced Placement examination in May.

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      If you are in Mr. Durnan's class, please purchase the following texts:


      If you are in Mr. Lin's class, please purchase the following texts:

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Contemporary Asian and Asian-American Lit

      In this course, we will read a variety of novels, essays and poems written by contemporary Asian and Asian-American authors. We will choose texts (some translated, some written in English) from an array of East Asian cultures --Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Japanese, among others, and explore the following questions: Are there defining characteristics of “Asian literature” apart from the author’s ethnicity or place of birth? What are the myths, values, or beliefs that inform or undergird these texts? What role does Asian literature play in the current literary landscape? How do Asian-American writers and/or Asians who write for a Western audience reconcile the collision or convergence of culture and language? And then, more generally, what makes a work “excellent,” worth studying, or “important,” regardless of culture of origin? Given the breadth of genres and viewpoints, much of our work will be exploratory as we seek to address these questions and others, inviting class members to suggest favorite writers and works to consider for our collective study and enjoyment.

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      Assorted poetry, stories, and essays by Ocean Vuong, Li-Young Lee, Amy Tan, Eric Liu, Haruki Murakami, Min Jin Lee, and Ruth Ozeki, among others (to be ordered or made available during semester)
      American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang (no need to purchase; teacher will provide copies)
      *Note: Additional texts may be assigned but can be ordered as needed.

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Creative Non-Fiction

      In this class students will practice many forms of creative nonfiction from personal narratives to fact based persuasive essays. Each class starts with a writing exercise designed to tap creativity, prompt further writing, and create a culture of free expression. Students will learn literary techniques and develop their own writing process. In addition to writing, students will also read creative non-fiction about the writing process.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Creative Writing

      Creative Writing is for students interested in writing poetry and short fiction. Each class starts with a writing exercise designed to tap creativity, prompt further writing, and create a culture of free expression. Students will learn literary techniques, elements of poetry and fiction, and more about their own writing process. While the bulk of the class is writing based, students will also read poetry and fiction, as well as a book and articles about the writing process. Students must be willing to take risks and be a member of a supportive community of writers. The class culminates in a writing portfolio of work and reflections done throughout the semester.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      Textbooks will be assigned in class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Fiction to Film

      We will read and watch several plays and novels and consider how they are adapted to film. How does the screenwriter transform the word, the culture, and the characters onto the screen? Texts and Films include:  One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, The Great Gatsby, Death of a Salesman, and a novel to be named later. A final project will be a student selected book or short story transformed into a screenplay and film scenes.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Finding Lost and Losing Found: Paths to Self-Discovery

      Who am I and why am I here? The answers to these questions are at the core of our existence. Often, though, they effortlessly escape us and delay our self-knowledge. This course offers students the opportunity to look for, if not actually find, themselves. Students will consider a variety of texts that look at young people who are transformed from “lost” to “found,” and vice versa. Students will also explore their own paths to self-discovery through exercises that build off course texts. These might include such traditional assessments as essays that consider the impact an individual, object, or belief has had on them, but it might also include constructing an e-portfolio as a way to collect journal entries, interviews, photos, and other elements that would help students construct their own auto-biographies. Possible texts may include: Hole in My Life, Life of Pi, A Field Guide to Getting Lost, and selections from Interpreter of Maladies.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Fly Fishing and Literature

      We will spend the fall semester with several goals in mind. First, we will explore a bit of the vast world of fly-fishing literature. As you will discover, not all of our texts are primarily about fly fishing, which may be a disappointment to some, but each does have fly fishing as a central metaphor. I think that you will find them to be a varied and interesting selection. Secondly, since this is an English course, we will do some writing, both fiction and non-fiction. I would like us to have a collection of pieces that can be gathered into a small book of some sort that we will publish for ourselves at the end of the term. Thirdly, I expect you to learn or develop your fly-fishing skills of casting, knot-tying, fly selection, reading water, and a number of other technical topics we will uncover as we go. Lastly, I would love for each of you to catch a fish on a fly, and to this end, I will offer day trips to local waters, which will most likely take place on Sundays throughout the fall while the season is open. There may even be an overnight trip to northern NH to fish the famed Connecticut River in Pittsburg.

      Writing
      Our writing this term will be either of the creative sort (short stories, poems), journal entries (reflections on readings, fishing, and life), or research reports on trout, insects, and flies.


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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: John Steinbeck

      John Steinbeck, world-renowned novelist, playwright, essayist and short-story writer was born in Salinas, California in 1902. Growing up in a rural town, he spent his summers working on local ranches, which exposed him to the harsh lives of migrant workers. Known for his stories about the struggles of low-income Americans, Steinbeck was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his novel The Grapes of Wrath in 1939, and he was also awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962. This seminar will explore the literature of Steinbeck, especially focusing on his characters and their quest for the American Dream.
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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Natural History Writing

      This non-fiction reading and writing course will introduce you to the many ways writers have put their encounters with nature into words. Nature writing takes many forms from essays to poems to stories. Though mostly non-fiction, nature writing encompasses all genres and has at its core memorable encounters with nature, which ultimately shed light on our humanity. We will read collections of essays and poems and use them as models for our own essay and poetry writing. Among the writers we will read will be Wallace Stegner, Edward Abbey, Peter Matthiessen, Gary Snyder, Edward O. Wilson, John McPhee, Edward Hoagland, Wendell Berry, Jim Harrison, Bruce Chatwin, Rick Bass, Annie Dillard, Rachel Carson, Barry Lopez, David Rains Wallace, Gretel Ehrlich, Diane Ackerman, David Quammen, Gary Paul Nabhan, Louise Erdrich, Terry Tempest Williams, Bill McKibben, Janisse Ray, Barbara Kingsolver, Doug Peacock, Michael Pollan. Look up any of these writers to get a sense of what you’re in for. We will complement our daily writing with frequent trips outside to gather material for our own writing. One product of the course will be a significant writing portfolio or book, filled with your reflections, observations, drawings, found objects, stories, and poems about your own experiences in the natural world. For juniors, this course will put you in the mood for OB!

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      Textbooks will be assigned in class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature

      Do you have a Bible on your shelf somewhere but you’ve never really read it? Did you know the Bible is more of a library than a book? Are the readings in chapel a total mystery to you? Have you ever encountered a biblical reference in another book and wished you knew more? Are you or a loved one named after a figure in the Bible but know little about the namesake? Do you ever wonder how and why the Bible animates historical and contemporary political speech and action? Do you ever wonder what are some of the biblical sources that undergird Western theories of law and justice? Do you appreciate great writing? Do you wish someday to be able to call yourself well-read?

      The Bible as Literature is an upper-level semester course which provides an additional choice for students seeking to satisfy the graduation requirement in Theology & Religious Studies. Cross-listed with the English dept, the course is listed as ENG on the transcript.

      METHOD:
      The course provides an introduction to the study of the Judeo-Christian canon of biblical texts as works of sacred literature and rhetoric. Students will explore the range of biblical genres through a survey of its historical, prophetic, poetic, sophistic, liturgical, gospel, and apocalyptic literatures. With an eye to historical, source, form, and redaction critical insights of scholarship and contemporary traditions, they will learn to decipher and defend their own interpretive and rhetorical choices.


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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Unplugged Narratives—Stories of Substance in the Age of Snapchat

      In this course, we will study a variety of approaches to creative non-fiction writing with a focus on storytelling and the personal essay, the role of the storyteller in society, and the different ways in which stories reflect and make meaning of individual and collective experience. We’ll seek ways of addressing the following questions, among others: How do stories both convey and challenge cultural norms? What is the relationship between storytelling and truth? What kinds of voices do we listen to? What is the role of the listener? What is my story and how do I tell it?

      At a time when putting personal “stories” out there is part of daily (or hourly) life, whether in the form of Instagram photos, tweets, or Snapchat stories, we will strive to discover what it means to shape a narrative the “old-fashioned way” -- through deliberate composition, sustained focus, and careful revision. At the same time, we will consider how our new modes of storytelling -- through social media and blogs -- co-exist and “converse” with the traditional long-form memoir, personal essay, poem, or play. In addition to writing our own stories, we will read work from writers known for the grace of their individual voices and the power of their stories.

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      Other reading: Assorted essays by Amy Tan, E.B. White, Annie Dillard, N. Scott Momaday, Wendell Berry, Eudora Welty, and Scott Russell Sanders, among others (Teacher will provide)

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced English Seminar: Utopian Literature

      Utopia or dystopia? This seminar will debate that question. Especially in today’s world that struggles with the haves and have-nots, nuclear weaponry and choices between safety and freedom, the literature of the following authors is as important and relevant today as it was in the times they were published. Be prepared to read, write about what you read and engage in debate if you choose this seminar.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
  • HISTORY

    • Foundations of Modern Society

      All ninth grade students are required to take Foundations of Modern Society, a one–semester course in the second semester. Emphasizing fundamental historical thinking skills through diverse case studies, this course serves as a unifying academic experience for the students and is a foundation for their future studies in history. It is intentionally broad in scope and teachers employ 3-4 diverse content areas to grapple with the essential question: How do social groups form and thrive? While the specific units vary from year to year and teacher to teacher, there is a special focus on the role governments play in forming societies, the way perception of the “other” can form a group, and the way an idea can develop a group identity. There is an explicit focus on developing in each student an understanding that every source, primary or secondary, is an interpretation. To that end, teachers employ in each unit at least of two different historians’ interpretations of a historical event, several contrasting primary sources, and various visual interpretations in each unit. This course also shares a main essential question with the English I course, “How do I learn best?” and focuses on developing students’ metacognition about their individual learning processes.

      Potential and past unit topics (at individual teacher’s discretion):
      • Collective Learning and Early Human Evolution
      • Agricultural Revolution
      • The Development of Ancient States: Rome, China, Political Philosophy
      • The Holocaust and Comparative Genocide Studies
      • New Colonialism and the Belgian Congo
      • Apartheid South Africa
      • Jim Crow America
      • Communist Revolutions
      • The Industrial Revolution

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 1

      This semester-length required US History course will be the starting point for all future historical inquiry at Holderness. The course will focus on the development of the Constitution and the Reconstruction eras. These foundational topics will introduce themes of a variety of civil liberties, but notably freedom of speech and suffrage. The essential question will be: What does it mean to be a US citizen?

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    • US History 2: 20th Century America through Film

      In this semester long elective, students will examine and study key events and topics of the twentieth century in America utilizing films as both primary and secondary sources. In a growing digital age, where video and films have become increasingly prevalent, students need to be critical viewers and recognize the possibility for bias and see the importance of perspective and point of view. Over the course of the semester we will look at four or five main events and time periods. Each unit will consist of three main parts. First we will spend time reading, discussing, and learning about the historical context of the given unit. This will be done through the readings of largely primary source documents, but also some secondary sources. Second we will watch a major motion picture that addresses some aspect of the topic (instead of purchasing books for this class, they will be required to purchase a digital copy of the films). Lastly, students will either write an essay or conduct in-depth debate style discussions both confirming and complicating the film as either a primary and/or secondary source. One of the main questions to be answered will be, how does [said film] contribute to our study and understanding of [said topic]?

      List of Potential Films Used: The Birth of A Nation (1915), Cinderella Man (2005), Mississippi Burning (1988), The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), Dr. Strangelove (1964), Platoon (1986) Or Apocalypse Now (1979)

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 2: A Bigger Government: The Great Depression and the New Deal

      Every facet of American society was rapidly changing at the turn of the 20th century and the modern American Identity was beginning to take shape. This semester elective will focus on the time period of 1900- 1945, primarily focusing on the how America got itself into the Great Depression and then how the Second World War, pulled America out of the Great Depression. We will look not only at the economic impacts of Depression but also the social and political impacts. Through primary and secondary source analysis, students will be forced to confirm and complicate the documents to further develop their own understandings of the time period. Lastly, we will also make connections to the 2008 Recession, the largest economic recession, since the Great Depression.

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 2: America in the 50’s and 60’s

      As many survey courses are forced to address this period in a brief span of time, America in the 50s and 60s allows students to take a longer look into this formative post-World War II period. While being taught as a focused survey course, the class will particularly focus on key topics, including: the Civil Rights movement, Korean Vietnam Wars, Eisenhower and Johnson presidencies and policies, Cold War, and political radicalism. Particular attention will be paid to the cultural history of the period, including books, movies, and music. Open to qualifying sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the Spring.

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 2: An African-American History for Today

      This course will consider what it means to be both African and American in today's United States by considering often over-looked African-American voices of our past and present. By using such touchstone moments as the arrival of the first Africans to the British colonies, early slave rebellions, the American Revolution, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Civil Rights Era, the Obama Presidency, and the Black Lives Matter movement, students will discover a new, richer history that pre-dates the Founding Fathers.

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 2: Case Studies in American Democracy

      This course was developed along with the Case Method Project at Harvard Business School. The foundational belief of the class, and the Case Method Project, is that the enduring challenges of self-government are complex and each individual must be prepared to make sense of them. The course will center around a diverse set of highly focused case studies from key moments in American history, including:
      • Meat Packing in the Progressive Era
      • Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Fight for Black Voting Rights
      • Leadership at the Federal Reserve in Relation to the 2008 Financial Crisis
      • Citizens United (2010) and Corporate Speech
      These cases will force students to confront questions that have been at the heart of America since its inception, including:
      • What is the proper balance between majority rule and the protection of individual rights?
      • Who is included in ‘We the People’?
      • What is (and should be) the role of informal institutions, such as the press, in democratic decision-making?
      • How should lawmakers conceive of the relationship between democracy and the market?
      By working within various historical contexts during case-based discussions, students hone their ability to think about key issues confronting our country today, in addition to gaining a deep understanding the nation’s history. By showing how these profound questions relate to tangible, concrete problems and outcomes, the cases also encourage students to take interest in them even outside of class. The course not only trains students to competently confront difficult questions facing citizens—it inspires them to seek these questions out in the first place.

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      No textbook required.
    • US History 2: Remember the Ladies!: American Women's History

      Not offered in 2019-20
      The purpose of this course is to examine the role that women have played in the history of the United States from the start of the women’s rights movement to the present. We will look at the ways in which women have empowered themselves in the context of patriarchal oppression and assess the stumbling blocks they met in their quest for social, political, and economic equality. In so doing, we will elevate women to their rightful place in the larger study of history and better understand what it means to be a woman, a man, and a human being.


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      No textbook required.
    • US History 2: The American Civil War

      Not offered in 2019-20
      The two principal goals of this seminar will be to familiarize students with some of the most important aspects of the Civil War and Reconstruction as well as the legacy left by the wake of such a divisive war. This course will include close examination of some of the more important historiographical debates. Topics include: sectionalism, antebellum political parties, slavery, abolition, Civil War politics, Presidential and Congressional Reconstruction. The course will then turn to look at more contemporary case studies illustrating the differences between the emancipation of slaves and the long to road to equality in American society. Students will read both primary and secondary resources to gain a complex understanding of the Civil War period and its lasting legacy.


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    • AP US/AP European History: Advanced History of the West 1 & 2

      Application required
      This two year course, beginning in the 10th or 11th grade year, will prepare students for both the Advanced Placement European History Exam and the Advanced Placement US History Exam. Students must submit an application and will be vetted for admission. This course will employ a broader lens to explore historical phenomena on both sides of the Atlantic embracing the globalized approach of modern historical research. Study of the American constitution, for example, will be endowed with prior study of the Enlightenment. Students will be expected to engage in a project in the summer between the two years of the course. Students will take both exams, but may petition to take only one at the end of their second year of the course (in their junior or senior year). This course will be team taught (either two teachers ½ time, or two teachers full time) for the first iteration of the course.


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    • AP Comparative Government & Politics

      This year-long course prepares students for the AP Comparative Government exam. The AP Curriculum mandates study of six core core countries. In this elective students will consider the United Kingdom, Mexico, Nigeria (three of the core countries) and India, a notable exception from the curriculum.

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    • AP European History

      Open to qualified 11th graders and 12th graders, the AP European History elective introduces students to the cultural, intellectual, economic, social, political, and diplomatic developments of European history from 1450 to the present day. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements that shaped Europe, the goals of the AP program in European history are to develop an understanding of the principal themes in modern European history, an ability to analyze historical evidence, and an ability to express historical understanding in writing.
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    • Americans in East Asia

      Not offered in 2019-20
      During the 20th century the United States fought three wars in East Asia: the Pacific War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. How did the East Asians perceive and react to the wars? How did the wars affect people's lives and societies in East Asia? How did these wars impact postwar relations between the United States and East Asia? How did race, culture, and ethnicity play significant roles in these wars? This course examines these questions by studying East Asia in these three American wars as an oral and social history. The course focuses on the human dimensions of the wars as experienced by those East Asians who fought and lived through them.


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    • Ancient Greece

      In this survey course (with a thematic approach), students will learn the history of ancient Greece. Topics covered in this course include Greek warfare, the Trojan War, Greek mythology, the origins of democracy, the Golden Age of Athens, Sparta, The Persian Wars, The Peloponnesian War, and Alexander the Great. Students will learn how the ancient Greeks influenced modern society and how they left behind a rich cultural and political legacy that still affects us today.

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    • Ancient Rome

      At its peak, the Roman Empire covered 2 million square miles and stretched from Scotland to the Persian Gulf. How did a village of mud huts, built next to a swamp, and about the size of Plymouth, NH achieve this? In this course we will follow the rise of this modest “kingdom” to a scrappy city-state with a representative government, to a vast imperial power ruled by an emperor and mighty armies. The history of this enterprise is part legendary, part political, and part economic. Along with a cast of larger than life characters such as Julius Caesar, Caesar Augustus, Caligula, and Constantine, we will peer into the lives of common men and women, slaves and freedmen, merchants and gladiators, and priests and prostitutes. We will examine how this global society that controlled much of Europe and the Mediterranean World laid the foundations for the modern world structures of law, politics, religion, and trade. We will end the course by considering what ways the American experience does, and does not, mirror that of the Romans.

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      Textbooks will be assigned in class.
    • Art History

      In this semester-long elective course students will examine and critically analyze various methods of artistic expression from around the world. There will be a special emphasis on not only the “high” fine arts of drawing, painting, sculpture and architecture, but also of various forms of “low art” including but not limited to popular film, cartoons and other forms of artistic expression with mass appeal. The essential questions driving the course focus on understanding the historiographical significance of artistic artifacts of a culture but also examine what differentiates a piece of art from a urinal on the wall. What is art and how is it made? How does art communicate and act as a record for human experience? What can we learn about a culture through its art forms? What skills and vocabulary can help us to effectively communicate about art?

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      Textbooks will be assigned in class.
    • Early Arab-Israeli Conflict

      Not offered in 2019-20
      This course will examine the history of the encounter and conflict between Jewish and Arab peoples surrounding the Holy Land from the late 19th through the mid-20th century. Coverage includes introductions to modern Jewish and Arab histories, evolution of Zionism and Arab nationalism, demise of the Ottoman Empire following World War I, the operation and demise of the British Mandate in Palestine between 1922 until 1948, and the effect of the developing Cold War in the 1950s.  The course will address these issues through a variety of readings, primary sources, and films. As a conclusion, students will present their own reflections and analyses of various aspects of the history of the conflict as a means to discuss its future implications.

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    • Enlightenment and Romanticism

      Offered on a bi-annual bases. LIKELY NOT TO BE OFFERED IN 20-21, interested rising juniors are advised to take in 2019-20.
      This semester elective is designed for students who develop an interest in intellectual history and want the opportunity to seek further depth. By reading and studying the poetry, art, and prose literature of these two movements, we hope to understand the dynamic interaction between the rationalism and optimism of 1750-1800 and the haunted, wild Romantic ideas of 1800-1850. We will also trace the legacy of these movements in the Western tradition. Students will spend most of their time evaluating and commenting on selected primary sources from Locke to Poe.


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    • Introduction to Philosophy

      What do I know? Why do I exist? Where does evil come from? These are just some of the questions this course attempts to answer. Introduction to philosophy aims to teach students how philosophy emerged in ancient times, from the presocratics like Thales of Miletus, to more established and recognized ancient philosophers like Socrates and Aristotle, and how they influenced later thinkers like Hypatia and Seneca. Besides covering famous philosophers, this course attempts to introduce students to life’s most riveting questions using both ancient and modern philosophy, and philosophy in today’s popular media like Star Wars.

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    • Irish History

      Not offered in 2019-20
      This is a survey course of Ireland’s 8,000-year history presented as a simulcast of past (history proper) and present (current affairs). The premise is that Ireland provides an effective case study for the concerns of contemporary peoples and historians: imperialism and post-colonialism, nationalism and globalism, religious and sectarian conflict, immigration and emigration, terrorism and conflict resolution. We explore how writers, filmmakers, and musicians have represented the rebirth of this “troubled” nation, and we ask provocative questions about nation building and defense.

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    • Political Media

      Not offered in 2019-20
      In this semester-long junior or senior elective students will consider the role of mass communications in politics. Each unit will consider a different aspect of the media including traditional print journalism, political cartoons, photography, radio, comedic television, and the expanding landscape of social media. Study of a particular medium will begin with case studies on how the communications technology was developed and used in various historical periods. Students will hone their analytical skills in each unit by composing an analysis of a modern example of the medium in question. With a growing public criticism of the role of the media in politics and the questions surrounding “Fake News,” this course will also focus on developing educated and inquisitive consumers of media. As a projects-based class, each unit will be assessed with students trying their hand the media form in question to comment on the a current events topic. Students should expect to engage in collaborative work, group discussions, short analytical compositions and practice real-world application of the theories, ideas and examples studied as they generate their own media.


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    • Post War American Intellectual History

      Not offered in 2019-20
      This course is designed to give students access to the great historically-inclined intellectual works of post-World War II America and will complement fall enrollment in Enlightenment and Romanticism. In particular, these works demonstrate modern intellectual reactions against mass movements. Through an international lens, the works would especially look at concerns surrounding the rise of both communism and fascism leading up to, including, and following the Second World War. Additionally, the works will take many of these global apprehensions and apply them to growth of massive organizations and materialism in America itself. This reaction gave birth to American movement that prized individuality over the group. Authors: Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism, Reinhold Niebuhr, The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness, Eric Hoffer, William Whyte, John Updike, David Brooks.


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    • Psychology 1

      Psychology I concentrates on the study of the human mind and human behavior. It is broken down into four units:
      1. The History of Psychology
      2. Biological Psychology
      3. Developmental Psychology
      4. Social Psychology
      The course is designed to give students a foundation of psychology and lead to an interest in further study of psychology. Regardless of how far students go with their study of psychology, students will have a better understanding of the human mind and reasoning behind human behavior after this introductory course.

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    • Psychology 2

      A semester-length opportunity for continued study in Psychology. The prerequisite is Psychology I, but these two courses do not have to be taken in the same calendar year (could be taken 11th and 12th grade for example). Psychology II includes topics such as learning and memory, motivation and emotion, intelligence testing and individual differences, and abnormal psychology. The course is an opportunity to dive deeper into the different types of psychology discussed in Psychology I, such as biological, developmental, cognitive, and social psychology.

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    • The Modern Middle East

      Offered on a bi-annual basis. LIKELY NOT TO BE OFFERED IN 2020-21; interested rising juniors are advised to take in 2019-20.
      Open to 11th and 12th graders, this semester-long elective explores the complexity of one of the most paradoxical regions in the world. The Middle East encompasses some of the richest and poorest countries. It is the geographic foundation of the three largest world religions and is perhaps one of the most turbulent regions of the twenty-first century. This course examines the sources of today’s socio-political problems, including twentieth century imperialism, the Balfour Declaration, the Cold War, and globalization. This course seeks to determine what needs to change in order to create a viable peace in the Middle East.


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    • Women and Warfare

      The history of warfare is a history that is seldom offered in schools. Yet, the history of war is the history of civilizations, which is why this topic is essential for the study and understanding of human civilization. Using as case studies individual women who were prominent in wartime, students will learn how warfare endured, evolved, and how it transformed the way humans interacted with each other in complex societies.

      Covering topics ranging from the ancient battles between Greek and Persian civilizations, to modern wars like World War II and recent 21st century military conflicts, this course will teach students the complexities of war throughout history using prominent women who were involved in conflict in diverse ways. Students, for example, will learn about the beginning and end of the Roman Empire through Cleopatra and the early Christian martyr Perpetua, about the One Hundred Years’ War through Joan of Arc, and about European Imperialism through the warrior women of the Kingdom of Dahomey in West Africa, among others. We will address the fundamental question of what happens to the history of warfare when it is looked at through women’s eyes.


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  • SCIENCE

    • Biology

      This course introduces students to essential principles of biology: cells, chemistry of life, genetics, evolutionary theory, biological diversity, and organism structure and function. Human anatomy and physiology are emphasized. Students use the framework of the scientific method to explore the living world in laboratory investigations. They are challenged to learn highly detailed material in order to gain greater appreciation for the diversity of life on earth, to understand prevailing thinking on the origin and evolution of living things, and to develop a clear sense of how Homo sapiens fit into this intricate web.

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    • AP Biology

      The AP Biology course covers the entire Advanced Placement curriculum, fully preparing students for the AP exam. There is a comprehensive laboratory component to the course, which includes applications of recombinant DNA technologies and experience using modern lab techniques and equipment. The AP Biology course assists students in organizing biological concepts and topics into a coherent conceptual framework, helps students internalize and effectively utilize the processes of scientific reasoning, and helps them develop or enhance their interest in biology and gain a sense of the subject’s relevance to their everyday lives. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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    • Chemistry

      Though this is a demanding college preparatory course, the teachers encourage an appreciation of the role chemistry plays in our daily lives outside of the classroom. Simply stated, chemistry is the study of matter and the changes it undergoes. This course is designed to challenge students’ problem-solving skills while covering the concepts of a traditional introductory college preparatory course. Students are given the opportunity to explore the world around them through lab work, class discussions, and activities including an in-depth look at the chemistry of the food we eat and a study of the gases in our atmosphere.

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    • Honors Chemistry

      This course is designed to explore the fundamental nature of matter and study its physical and chemical characteristics. Students engage in laboratory activities that reinforce the scientific method, apply knowledge to real-world applications, and integrate technology in the science classroom. The honors course differs from regular chemistry in its more strenuous mathematical component, complexity, and depth of theory studied.

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    • Physics

      Physics examines four basic areas of study: mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermal energy, and modern physics. The objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to identify four unifying themes of science: scale, models (physical, mathematical, or conceptual), constancy and change, and systems.

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    • Honors Physics

      The Honors Physics course is a rigorous, math-intensive introduction to the subject. The bulk of the course is devoted to the study of mechanics, or the behavior of particles subject to systems of forces, and includes topics such as one- and two-dimensional kinematics, Newton’s Laws, momentum, mechanical energy, rotational motion, gravitation, and oscillations. During the final quarter of the year students examine a variety of modern topics, particularly electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes collaborative work and problem-solving techniques and involves frequent lab work. The course is designed to develop a solid foundation for college-level physics and to instill an appreciation for and curiosity about the complexity of the universe.

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    • AP Physics C: Mechanics

      AP Physics C is a demanding college-level course that requires the use of calculus. The course emphasizes collaborative work and problem-solving techniques. The course aims at covering Mechanics (one of the two Physics C AP examinations). Instruction includes video lectures and computer applets. In class, students will engage in problem sets and labs. Labs – both virtual and real – will be done on a weekly basis. This course is designed to replace introductory college physics courses designed for physics and engineering majors.

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    • AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

      AP Physics C-E&M is a second-year AP physics class that is intended to replace a college-level introductory course in electricity and magnetism. The course makes extensive use of calculus techniques in the exploration of topics such as electric fields, electric potential, capacitance, circuits, magnetic fields, and electromagnetic induction. Students are required to work well both independently and in small groups, and labs involve long-term, independent projects. Due to the sophisticated conceptual material and mathematical techniques involved, it is strongly recommended that students complete AP calculus and AP physics C-M before taking the course.

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    • Environmental Science

      Students enrolled in the Environmental Science course are assumed to possess a broad background in biology and chemistry. Students are provided with experience in advanced field work, laboratory techniques, and laboratory investigation reporting techniques through activities focusing on local ecosystems. Students pursue, from both scientific and social scientific perspectives, the effect of human societies on the natural world. The course stresses students' responsibility for determining the quality of the environment and, consequently, their own lives. Sustainability principles are given special emphasis. Students are trained to identify and seek solutions to environmental problems. In addition to local environmental issues, students investigate the global trends of overpopulation, ecosystem degradation, atmospheric change, and loss of biodiversity.

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    • AP Environmental Science

      The goal of the Advanced Placement Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems, both natural and humanmade, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study (e.g. biology, chemistry, earth science, geography), yet there are several major unifying themes that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The course takes advantage of the environs surrounding our campus for firsthand research. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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    • Ecological Case Studies

      This semester course is designed to reinforce knowledge of ecological interactions and scientific method and to gain experience in field work. Varied ecosystems will be studied using actual data from ongoing research and will include Australian eucalypt dry forest, coral reefs, Central American cloud forests, and subtropical rain forests. Field studies will be carried out during a northern hardwood forest unit. A variety of animals and plants including green sea turtles, koalas, invasive plant species, amphibians, lionfish and coastal sharks will be studied within the context of the pertinent ecosystem. Policy implications of research and pertinent social factors will also be explored, and thus insights into the importance of application of science in developing land and marine use policies will be gained. Appropriate for any junior or senior student, this course will also provide good preparation for potential senior thesis work in environmental studies, ecology, or conservation biology, including utilizing established connections to ongoing international research.

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      Textbooks will be assigned in class.
    • Exercise Physiology

      In this course, students will study acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. Muscle, environmental physiology, practical physiology testing, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular function in response to exercise training will be emphasized in the classroom and applied to laboratory activities.

      Objectives: Students who successfully complete the requirements for this course will:
      • Have a foundational understanding of the complex nature of the human organism from a physiological perspective.
      • Understand the muscular and energy physiological demands from an inactive state to an active state.
      • Understand the acute physiological responses to exercise.
      • Understand the chronic physiological adaptations to exercise.
      • Have mastered basic physiological laboratory experiments and procedures.
      This is a complementary course to the Topics in Human Anatomy and Physiology course.

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    • Neuroscience

      This course will focus on the nervous, endocrine, immune, excretory and digestive systems. Questions such as: Why is laughter infectious? What role does emotion play in memory? How does alcoholism affect balance? How does cancer immunotherapy work? Why does diabetes affect the kidneys? And just how important is vitamin D? will be addressed through discussions, readings, lectures, videos and activities. Laboratory investigations will include a fetal pig dissection and physiology labs. This is offered as a semester course to juniors and seniors. This is a complementary course to the Anatomy and Physiology course focusing on exercise physiology.

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    • Snow Science

      This will be a winter/spring semester course in which we’ll learn the basics of avalanche formation and snow metamorphism. We’ll learn how weather and mountain terrain play a role in avalanches, and how to forecast avalanches and travel safely in the backcountry. We’ll do everything from basic physics problem sets to digging snow pits outside to making our own snowflakes in the lab. Each student will choose a particular avalanche forecasted region, like Mount Washington, on which to focus for an avalanche forecasting and weather project in January and February.

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    • STEM Robotics I

      As an introductory course in robotics the students will learn JAVA computer programming as well as problem solving strategies. This course will involve students in the development, building and programming of a Tetrix robot. Working in teams they design, build, program and document their progress. Topics include motor control, gear ratios, torque, friction, sensors, timing, program loops, logic gates, decision-making, timing sequences, propulsion systems and binary number systems. Student designed robots will be programmed to compete in a variety of autonomous and remote controlled challenges.

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    • STEM Robotics II

      The STEM Robotics II course builds upon the skills students learned in STEM Robotics I. Working in teams, students will design, build, and program Tetrix robots which must complete more complex and more precise tasks with less margin for error than the projects in STEM Robotics I.

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  • MATHEMATICS

    • Algebra 1

      This is a cornerstone course designed to prepare students to investigate and master more complex, but related, concepts studied over the balance of the mathematics curriculum. Students review the language of algebra, real number operations, and approaches used to solve linear equations before engaging in an expanded study of function graphing, linear analysis, methods of solving linear inequalities, and systems of both inequalities and linear equations. Multiplication of polynomials, factoring, and solving quadratic and exponential functions, together with simplification and evaluation of radical expressions, constitute the remainder of the course.

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    • Geometry

      This course covers the fundamental concepts of geometry, with algebra and discrete mathematical topics woven into the curriculum. Topics include reasoning and proof, building blocks of geometric shapes, congruence and similarity, right triangles and trigonometry, transformations of figures and equations, and surface area and volume.

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    • Algebra 2

      In this course, students continue the study of concepts introduced in Algebra I and Geometry. Concepts such as linear functions, linear regression, data analysis, matrices, and systems of equations are introduced as important tools to explore, analyze, and make conjectures as we further develop mathematical problem-solving skills. Using real-world examples, students explore quadratic equations, polynomials, and operations of functions. Students also examine properties, applications, and graphs of absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, power, radical, and trigonometric functions.

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      If you purchased a used book at the end of the year, please bring it to school with you. If you have not purchased a book yet, you do not need to purchase one. We will use them sporadically throughout the year for homework/reference and we will lend one out to you if you do not already have one.
    • Honors Algebra 2

      In this honors course, students continue the study of concepts introduced in Algebra I and Geometry. Concepts such as linear functions, linear regression, data analysis, matrices, and systems of equations are introduced as important tools to explore, analyze, and make conjectures as we further develop mathematical problem-solving skills. Using real-world examples, students explore quadratic equations, polynomials, and operations of functions. Students also examine properties, applications, and graphs of absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, power, radical, and trigonometric functions.

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    • Precalculus

      This course offers a more rigorous approach to the study of functions and to the topics needed for calculus. The emphasis of this course is on analysis through formal mathematical notation and the relation of mathematical concepts to real world scenarios. Major topics include linear, exponential, and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions; polynomials; radical functions; mathematical limits; composition of functions; and inverses of functions.

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    • Honors Precalculus

      This course is designed for students who have completed Honors Algebra 2. Honors Precalculus covers all of the topics studied in the regular pre-calculus course; however, the pace is slightly faster than regular pre-calculus so that the students will be able to cover more trigonometry and topics that will prepare them for AP Calculus. By the end of the class the students will not only be introduced to topics that are vital to understanding Calculus, such as continuity and limits, but they will also be introduced to the derivative through the limit definition.

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    • Calculus

      Calculus begins with a thorough review of standard high school mathematics in preparation for Calculus and the SAT. The class is designed to introduce students to important Calculus topics and to prepare them for college Calculus. The course will cover the conceptual basis of Calculus including the limit definition of the derivative and Riemann Sums. It will also cover in great detail the rules for differentiation and introduce the integral. By the end of the class students will be exposed to the applications of Calculus with Related Rate and Optimization problems.

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    • AP Calculus AB

      AP Calculus is primarily concerned with developing a student’s understanding of the concepts of calculus through the use of the unifying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

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    • AP Calculus BC

      AP Calculus BC is a semester course designed for students who have completed AP Calculus AB. The course is a continuation of Calculus AB and emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The course will cover advanced integration, differential equations, sequences and series, (including Taylor Series and Maclaurin Series), polar functions, and parametric functions. Students are expected to take the AP Calculus BC exam in May.

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    • Differential Equations

      Differential Equations is a semester-long course for students who have completed AP Calculus AB and/or BC. Students will study ways to solve differential equations graphically, numerically, and algebraically. Students will also study the real world applications of these types of equations.

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    • Topics in Mathematics

      In this year-long course, students study mathematics in contexts and develop their abilities to problem solve, reason, and communicate. Real world situations provide the contexts for mathematical investigation. The topics include but are not limited to: logic, numeration, statistics, financial mathematics, history of mathematics, and functions.

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    • AP Statistics

      This is the high school equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college statistics course. In this course, students develop strategies for collecting, organizing, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data, with a focus on univariate and bivariate data. Simulations and probability aid students in constructing models for chance phenomena and lead to the study of inference, where students learn to complete confidence intervals and hypotheses tests. Students use technology, such as the Ti calculator, Fathom, and online applets, to strengthen their understanding of statistical concepts. Throughout the year, students apply statistical skills learned in class to analyze data from a variety of sources, including data from our athletic teams, student-generated data, and online sources. The coursework culminate with AP exam in May.

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    • Computer Science

      Python is an accessible programming language whose simple yet powerful structure and easy-to-use development environment allow students to achieve impressive results quickly. Using this programming language, students will learn the basics of Computer Science including variables, conditional statements (if-else), iterations (loops) and the fundamentals of programming design and implementation. We will also utilize Python’s ‘turtle graphics’ module, which allows for two-dimensional designs. Throughout the course, we will discuss the challenges and opportunities related to the explosion of computer use in the modern world.

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    • AP Computer Science

      This year-long course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data(algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. The course is designed For 11th and 1 zth grade students who have completed Algebra 2 with a grade of B or higher.

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    • AP Macroeconomics

      This semester long course will give students an understanding of the economy as a whole. Students will look at what is happening at a national level. This course allows the student to think more about theory and abstract ideas in economics. Students will learn about the national debt, GDP in different countries, international economics, and an economy’s growth. This course is for 12th graders, who will have taken economics prior, and may be taken by 11th graders, but it is designed to be taken the year before heading to college. All students must complete summer work in advance of the course.

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    • AP Microeconomics

      This semester long course will give the students an understanding of the basic principles of economics based on what consumers and producers do as individuals in an economy. Microeconomics consists of more math concepts for example, using the supply and demand graphs. We will look at specifics in an economy rather than the whole economy. Students will learn the basic concepts of microeconomics, different product markets and how they work, supply and demand, and the role of the government. This course is for 12th graders, who will have taken economics prior, and may be taken by 11th graders, but it is designed to be taken the year before heading to college. All students must complete summer work in advance of the course.

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    • STEM Robotics I

      As an introductory course in robotics the students will learn JAVA computer programming as well as problem solving strategies. This course will involve students in the development, building and programming of a Tetrix robot. Working in teams they design, build, program and document their progress. Topics include motor control, gear ratios, torque, friction, sensors, timing, program loops, logic gates, decision-making, timing sequences, propulsion systems and binary number systems. Student designed robots will be programmed to compete in a variety of autonomous and remote controlled challenges.

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    • STEM Robotics II

      The STEM Robotics II course builds upon the skills students learned in STEM Robotics I. Working in teams, students will design, build, and program Tetrix robots which must complete more complex and more precise tasks with less margin for error than the projects in STEM Robotics I.

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  • MODERN & CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

    • French 1

      The goals of the first two years of French are to develop concurrently the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose the student to the culture of the francophonic world. At the more advanced levels, the department emphasizes the development of reading and writing skills through the study of literature and current cultural texts, while continuing to provide grammar review. An Advanced Placement course is offered to qualified students with the permission of the department and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

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      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.  
       
      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-61857-869-3.
       
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    • French 2

      The goals of the first two years of French are to develop concurrently the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose the student to the culture of the francophonic world. At the more advanced levels, the department emphasizes the development of reading and writing skills through the study of literature and current cultural texts, while continuing to provide grammar review. An Advanced Placement course is offered to qualified students with the permission of the department and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-62680-276-6
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      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.  
       
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    • French 3

      French 3 is an intermediate course in French language and culture, bridging the levels of beginning language to advanced study. During the year, students continue their study of French grammar and become more proficient at interpreting, reading, speaking and writing directly in the language. Students also continue their study of French and francophone cultures around the world.

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      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (2015). 

    • French 4

      French 4 continues the study of French language and serves as the preparatory year for Advanced Placement French Language and Culture. Students develop greater proficiency in the details of French language through the study of advanced grammar, readings, discussion, and composition. The goals of the course are to develop the ability to discuss one's ideas coherently and logically in spoken and written French and to deepen one's knowledge and understanding of French civilization and francophone culture through readings in French and francophone literature.

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      *
      *Please make sure the Graded French Reader is a 4th Edition.

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    • AP French Language and Culture

      The AP French Language and Culture course emphasizes continued language acquisition, communication skills, and cultural knowledge and understanding. The course will be conducted exclusively in French, and students will practice on a daily basis their interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication and expression. The course organizes the study of literature, current events, and cultural topics under the umbrella of the six College Board designated themes: Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Global Challenges, Aesthetics and Beauty, Family and Communities, and Private and Public Identities. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

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      *Please also get a subscription from Canal Academie.
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    • French Culture

      This semester-long course will survey French culture from the French Revolution to modern times through literature, art, and film. The course will follow an historical chronology and will present important events and socio-cultural elements from a francophone perspective. For each time period, students will learn a general history, read one or two excerpts from literature, study a few works of art, and see one film. They will compare the francophone perspective with their American experience through discussion and composition in French. This course is recommended for students who have completed French 3 or French 4.

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      *You may rent or purchase this book.
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    • Latin 3

      Third and fourth year Latin are the reading years, and the focus shifts from the building blocks of vocabulary and grammar to understanding the art of translation and the world of Latin literature. At the beginning of the third year, regardless of what grammar remains to be learned, we launch immediately into reading a Latin text. Concurrent with reading, the first months are filled with ongoing review, and any new grammar not covered in the first two years is explored and learned as it arises in context in the readings. Texts read in the third year include excepts from Satyricon of Petronius (a graded reader subtitled “The Millionaire’s Dinner Party”), Caesar’s De Bello Gallico, and Ovid’s tale of Pyramus and Thisbe from Metamorphoses.

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    • AP Latin

      AP Latin at Holderness is offered to any student whose proficiency with the language has risen to the appropriate level. Successful completion of the fourth year course (or an equivalent program) and recommendation of the instructor are prerequisites for acceptance into AP Latin. See the College Board course description for more information.

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    • Mandarin Chinese 1

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

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    • Mandarin Chinese 2

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

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    • Mandarin Chinese 3

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

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      To be determined during the school year.
    • Mandarin Chinese 4

      The goals of the Mandarin Chinese program are to develop basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension, and to expose students to the culture of China. Students enrolled in Mandarin Chinese will spend time focusing on fundamental skills of vocabulary, syntax, character recognition and drawing, and tonal recognition and pronunciation. Each successive course builds on the work done in previous years, leading to linguistic and cultural proficiency in the intermediate and advanced courses.

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      To be determined during the school year.
    • Spanish 1

      The aim of the first two years of Spanish is to help students achieve a mastery of basic written and spoken language, and to introduce Spanish and Hispanic history and culture. The Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 courses stress vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Students and teachers use internet sources alongside the textbook to engage with real-life situations, current events and to look at the cultural differences and similarities between what we study and the students' own experiences.

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      www.vhlcentral.com
      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.  
       
      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-61857-216-5.
       
      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Second Edition, 2014). 
    • Spanish 2

      The aim of the first two years of Spanish is to help students achieve a mastery of basic written and spoken language, and to introduce Spanish and Hispanic history and culture. The Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 courses stress vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Students and teachers use internet sources alongside the textbook to engage with real-life situations, current events and to look at the cultural differences and similarities between what we study and the students' own experiences.

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       ISBN #: 978-1-61857-485-5
      www.vhlcentral.com
      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.  
       
      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-61857-218-9.
       
      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Second Edition, 2014). 
    • Spanish 3

      In the third and fourth years, students continue to expand their working vocabularies and grammatical understanding, and focus on writing and speaking with fluidity and idiomatic language. Students will study not only literary selections in Spanish, but will also use current events, pop culture, art and historical events to practice the language and increase their cultural understanding of the many Spanish-speaking regions of the world. These courses are conducted almost exclusively in Spanish.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-61857-487-9
      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.  
       
      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-61857-220-2.
       
      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Second Edition, 2014). 
    • Spanish 4

      In the third and fourth years, students continue to expand their working vocabularies and grammatical understanding, and focus on writing and speaking with fluidity and idiomatic language. Students will study not only literary selections in Spanish, but will also use current events, pop culture, art and historical events to practice the language and increase their cultural understanding of the many Spanish-speaking regions of the world. These courses are conducted almost exclusively in Spanish.

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      ISBN#: 978-1-68005-700-3
      Note: Students will need both the textbook and access to the Supersite.  Please click on the book pictured above to purchase the textbook and Supersite access code directly from Vista Higher Learning.  
       
      If you will be purchasing just the Supersite Access Code, and not the textbook (if you have acquired the textbook from another source), please use the following ISBN number: 978-1-68005-683-9.
       
      Reminder: if you do purchase the textbook from another source, please verify that you have the correct edition (Fourth Edition). 
    • AP Spanish Language

      The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes continued language acquisition, communication skills, and cultural knowledge and understanding. The course will be conducted exclusively in Spanish, and students will practice on a daily basis their interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication and expression. The course organizes the study of literature, current events, and cultural topics under the umbrella of the six College Board designated themes: Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Global Challenges, Aesthetics and Beauty, Family and Communities, and Private and Public Identities. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

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      Note: Students will need both a book and access to the SupersitePlease use the following Supersite access code if you are purchasing a used book: 978-1-61857-226-4

      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • AP Spanish Literature

      The AP Spanish Literature and Culture course is a survey of Spanish and Hispanic literary works ranging from the 13th century to the 21st century. Students read and analyze poetry, prose, essays and theater pieces from several time periods, including such notable works as Cervantes' El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (excerpts), Lorca's La casa de Bernarda Alba, and poetry by Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Students refine their analytical writing skills through comparative essays and shorter, interpretive pieces. Much of the class time is spent discussing the readings; students thus hone their speaking skills as well. The class is conducted exclusively in Spanish. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

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      If you purchase a used textbook, make sure there is no writing in it.

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  • THEOLOGY & RELIGIOUS STUDIES

    • Advanced English Seminar: The Bible as Literature

      Do you have a Bible on your shelf somewhere but you’ve never really read it? Did you know the Bible is more of a library than a book? Are the readings in chapel a total mystery to you? Have you ever encountered a biblical reference in another book and wished you knew more? Are you or a loved one named after a figure in the Bible but know little about the namesake? Do you ever wonder how and why the Bible animates historical and contemporary political speech and action? Do you ever wonder what are some of the biblical sources that undergird Western theories of law and justice? Do you appreciate great writing? Do you wish someday to be able to call yourself well-read?

      The Bible as Literature is an upper-level semester course which provides an additional choice for students seeking to satisfy the graduation requirement in Theology & Religious Studies. Cross-listed with the English dept, the course is listed as ENG on the transcript.

      METHOD:
      The course provides an introduction to the study of the Judeo-Christian canon of biblical texts as works of sacred literature and rhetoric. Students will explore the range of biblical genres through a survey of its historical, prophetic, poetic, sophistic, liturgical, gospel, and apocalyptic literatures. With an eye to historical, source, form, and redaction critical insights of scholarship and contemporary traditions, they will learn to decipher and defend their own interpretive and rhetorical choices.

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    • World Religions

      The one-semester World Religions course cultivates students' cultural and analytical reasoning, expands their capacities for empathy and creative imagination, develops their reflective and moral sensibilities, and builds foundational knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

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    • Theology & Ethics

      This course begins by examining the nature of ethics. What are they? How do we come by our ethical stances? Are there any ethics that are universal? Following these inquiries, students then move to an ethical inquiry of the scriptures. Which pieces of the Judeo-Christian writings are applicable to the decision making required in today’s world? The course culminates with formal debates on a variety of current ethical concerns.

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    • PERFORMING ARTS

      • Ninth Grade Seminar in Art

        1. Ninth Grade Seminart uses creative expression as a tool for authenticating concepts, personalizing abstractions, and changing attitudes by synthesizing the emotional and intellectual responses to any aspect of our lives.
        2. Through teamwork and problem solving, this course is designed to provide students with a familiarity of how to use creative expression through design thinking in a variety of settings with an understanding of the role of personal creative expression.
        3. It is a goal of the course to provide increased confidence in students’ artistic, imaginative and creative abilities.

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        No textbook required.
      • A Capella Fall

        1. A Capella will be working on a variety of pieces written for mixed voice group singing, with the opportunity for solo and group work. The aim of each semester will be to expose students to the extensive world of a Capella. They will perform a concert each semester, with many other performance opportunities including chapel, assembly, and competing at the International Competition of High School Acapella (ICHSA.) The course will especially appeal to students who are interested in furthering their knowledge and abilities in singing and general musical knowledge.

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          No textbook required.
      • A Capella Spring

        1. A Capella will be working on a variety of pieces written for mixed voice group singing, with the opportunity for solo and group work. The aim of each semester will be to expose students to the extensive world of a Capella. They will perform a concert each semester, with many other performance opportunities including chapel, assembly, and competing at the International Competition of High School Acapella (ICHSA.) The course will especially appeal to students who are interested in furthering their knowledge and abilities in singing and general musical knowledge.

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          No textbook required.
      • Band Fall

        1. Students will play a variety of genres of music based on the abilities and instruments provided in the group as it varies year to year. The aim of each semester will be to expose students to a breadth of music, work on playing as an ensemble, solo/improvisation work, basic music comprehension and putting on a concert. The ensemble performs throughout the year at many school events and will have access to use of the ProTool’s recording studio.
        2. Prior individual instruction is required for enrollment in the course; This instruction does not need to have been taken at Holderness.

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        No textbook required.
      • Band Spring

        1. Students will play a variety of genres of music based on the abilities and instruments provided in the group as it varies year to year. The aim of each semester will be to expose students to a breadth of music, work on playing as an ensemble, solo/improvisation work, basic music comprehension and putting on a concert. The ensemble performs throughout the year at many school events and will have access to use of the ProTool’s recording studio.
        2. Prior individual instruction is required for enrollment in the course; This instruction does not need to have been taken at Holderness.

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        No textbook required.
      • Introduction to Music Theory

        1. This introductory music course will focus on basic music reading, notation comprehension and rudimentary keyboard skills. The student does not need to be able to read music, as they will learn all the basic building blocks for music: note names and values, key signatures, intervals, scales and basic chord progressions. This work will be mirrored on the keyboard.

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        No textbook required.
      • Digital Recording

        Description coming soon.

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        No textbook required.
      • American Music History: From Ragtime to Hiphop

        This semester's music history course will be James Scott to Travis Scott (from Ragtime music to Hip-Hop/Trap music and everything in between.) This class will contain ragtime, blues, gospel, jazz, rhythm & blues, soul, funk, rap, and hip-hop. There are three main objectives: gaining rudimentary knowledge of the musical elements particular to each style; recognizing the most significant creators and practitioners of each style; and examining the social, economic, historical context which the music both reflects and influences.

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        Textbooks will be assigned in class.
      • Music Performance and Production

        This semester course will meet two days a week and provide advanced credit for the higher level of music achievement within a curriculum structure and is designed to provide students with the opportunity for a more rigorous curriculum in the music program for college readiness. With the understanding that “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts,” students will focus on creating parts in an arrangement that make the band sound better rather than focusing on individual skills. Listening to existing recordings and analyzing each individual part and how it fits into the whole will be a focus. The class will work up material in different genres: Jazz, Funk, Folk, Americana, R&B, Pop, Classical and also write original material both individually and collaboratively. Developing their arranging skills they will re-work familiar songs into entirely different arrangements through alteration of meter, genre, tempo, etc. Performance opportunities for the school community as well as possible outside of the school competitions will be used as a metric for measuring their growth as musicians. Students will also participate in field trips related to experiencing musical performances and recording opportunities. The curriculum will include music theory, composition, digital recording and performance practices. This course will be offered every two years depending on student participation.

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        *Please note: we may add another text this summer.
        Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
      • Intro to Acting

        1. This course will cover the foundations of acting; emotions, movement, voice, and creating characters. Through exercises and activities, students will develop the basic skills necessary to create roles. Students will learn about the history of acting, film versus stage performance, techniques for memorization, and utilizing the actor’s tools – voice and body.
        2. The goal of this course is for students to gain basic skills in acting, analyzing, improvisation, visualization, breathing, and relaxation as well as a working vocabulary of theatre terms. This course also serves as an excellent opportunity for students to sharpen their public speaking skills.
        3. Handouts as well as scenes and monologues excerpted from plays.


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        No textbook required.
      • Acting and Scene Study

        1. This semester-long course is designed to give students the opportunity to create advanced work in the areas of acting, directing, playwriting, and video production. Student will acquire and develop the basic skills of acting while increasing their comfort level with performing on stage.
        2. Through monologues, scenes, and exercises, students will examine the techniques an actor uses to develop a character. Exercises include movement, sense memory, personalization, objective, beat work, and beginning text analysis. In this course, there will also be opportunities to analyze, critique, and construct meanings from informal and formal theater, video, and film.
        3. This course is open to 11th grade and 12th grade students only.


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        No textbook required.
      • Improv for Acting

        This Improv for Acting class is geared towards any student who wants to develop their improv, acting and interpersonal skills through teaching the craft of improvisational acting. Student actors will say, “I’m not good at improv” or “I’m not funny enough for improv”. In this class, you will gather the tools for your improv and acting toolbox that will change that mindset. Many students believe they have the ability to make things up and in this course, you will learn the improv skills that will move you beyond making things up. It will help you use those skills to develop and sustain believable characters that will carry scenes and sketches. As an actor, improv teaches you the immediacy of the moment. It also helps you to dig deeper into character exploration that is not found within the script. It increases your confidence and reduces your self-judgment.

        Learning Outcomes and Skill Acquisition:
        • Develops your voice as an actor
        • Build characters
        • Minimizes your inner-critic
        • Allows you to adopt a more yes, AND attitude
        • Improves your ability to think on your feet
        • Develops your listening skills on stage
        • Increases your level of connection to others
        • Gets you out of your head

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        No textbook required.
      • Creative Movement

        1. This performance-based course is designed to help each student become a versatile, adaptable and creative dancer, choreographer and communicator. Thecourse begins with a foundation of basic dance steps necessary to put together simple combinations to create choreography for different genres of music. This provides students with technique and skills at levels appropriate to the experience they bring with them. Students are engaged with four core elements of dance: basic dance steps, combinations, theories and contexts, and projects and performance. These elements are taught through daily class warm ups, exercises and practice, and in individual and group work. Students will dance during every class.
        2. The goal of this course if for students to develop their individual movement language with an emphasis on fusing physical practices and creative collaboration while building a dance vocabulary.
        3. Juniors & Seniors only.


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        No textbook required.
  • VISUAL ARTS

    • Ninth Grade Seminar in Art

      1. Ninth Grade Seminart uses creative expression as a tool for authenticating concepts, personalizing abstractions, and changing attitudes by synthesizing the emotional and intellectual responses to any aspect of our lives.
      2. Through teamwork and problem solving, this course is designed to provide students with a familiarity of how to use creative expression through design thinking in a variety of settings with an understanding of the role of personal creative expression.
      3. It is a goal of the course to provide increased confidence in students’ artistic, imaginative and creative abilities.

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      No textbook required.
    • 2D Graphic Design

      1. This semester long course is a hands-on graphic design art course with strong emphasis on communication and design careers. This course seeks to link the eye of the artist with the power of the computer. Students will learn basic image manipulation, logo design, promotional poster design, t-shirt design, and the skills of commission works from a client. Other design opportunities will be offered depending on student interest and client requests.
      2. Students will work with Adobe Creative Suite, focusing on Photoshop and Illustrator to develop both Raster and Vector images.
      3. The goal of this course is for students to learn the foundation of design as a career and utilize the elements and principles of design to ensure quality outcome.  Lastly, students will learn to respect their own ideas and artistic expressions and those of others as they analyze and evaluate design lessons.

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      No textbook required.
    • Studio Practices

      1. Student artists in the Studio Practices course will experiment with a variety of media to create visual art during the semester long course. The elements of art (line, shape, space, color, value, texture, and form) are applied in two-dimensional Drawing, Painting and Design lessons. Students will begin to apply the principles of design, (rhythm/ movement, balance, proportion/ scale, variety/ unity, emphasis, contrast and repetition) in their art expression. The development and application of artistic techniques and skills are emphasized.
      2. Students will express their ideas by using art as a form of communication and will develop the confidence and ability to evaluate and discuss their own work and the work of others. As students work toward an appreciation and understanding of art, they will relate visual arts to various historical and cultural traditions. Students will learn to respect their own ideas and artistic expressions and those of others as they analyze and evaluate works of art.
      3. Students will develop Final Portfolios that will be assessed after each lesson and at the end of the semester with the guidance of specific grading rubrics and group critiques.

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      No textbook required.
    • AP Studio Art: Drawing/ 2D/ 3D Portfolio

      AP Studio Art provides the opportunity for the visually inclined students to excel and receive recognition on a national level. It allows students to compare their work with other high school students throughout the nation, and helps them prepare an excellent portfolio for study at the college level. All students enrolling in the course are expected to submit an AP Portfolio. 

      AP Studio Art: Drawing/ 2D/ 3D is a two-semester course that focuses on producing a large number of quality works that demonstrate mastery of fundamental artistic concepts. In their work, students will investigate all three components of the AP Portfolio; Quality, Concentration and Breadth. Students will further develop their technical skills and creative thought processes as they find their own way to communicate visually. Students will also be presented with problems that require unconventional and imaginative solutions. This fast paced course requires the student to be highly motivated and interested in the serious study of art, which may lead to college credit. Motivation, imagination and commitment are required to succeed in the course. 

      There are three portfolio types in AP Studio Art. A Drawing Portfolio, a 2D Portfolio and a 3D portfolio. Descriptions for each to follow. 

      The AP Drawing Portfolio is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth are drawing issues that can be addressed through a variety of means, which could include painting, printmaking, mixed media, etc. Abstract, observational, and inventive works may demonstrate drawing competence. The range of marks used to make drawings, the arrangement of those marks, and the materials used to make the marks are endless. Projects will be structured around the elements of art and principles of design. In these projects, students will need to use their knowledge of technique and materials to communicate through their art. This encourages students to use critical thinking skills, while also developing their own voices as visual artists. Thus, students will develop mastery in concept, composition, and execution of their personal artistic vision. 

      The purpose of AP Studio Art: 2-D Design is to provide an intensive study of the process of creating two-dimensional design (2-D) artwork using both traditional fine and digital art media (materials and tools). Emphasis is placed on the quality, breadth and concentration of the student’s production and experiences in digital art, photography, drawing, and design. Projects will be structured around the elements of art and principles of design. In these projects, students will need to use their knowledge of technique and materials to communicate through their art. This encourages students to use critical thinking skills, while also developing their own voices as visual artists. Thus, students will develop mastery in concept, composition, and execution of their personal artistic vision. 

      The purpose of AP Studio Art: 3-D Design is to provide an intensive study of the process of creating three-dimensional (3-D) artwork using the elements and principles of design in an integrative way. Emphasis is placed on the quality, breadth and concentration of the student’s understanding of design principles relating to Space and Depth. In these projects, students will need to use their knowledge of technique and materials to communicate through their art. This encourages students to use critical thinking skills, while also developing their own voices as visual artists. Thus, students will develop mastery in concept, construction, and presentation of their personal artistic vision.


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      No textbook required.
    • Photography I

      1. Photography I will establish a solid photographic foundation by introducing students to the magic, romanticism and craft of traditional B&W film and darkroom photography in a studio with a hands-on environment. We will often work together on and off campus shooting as a group while discussing the photographic merits of particular places, quality of light and shooting at different times of day.
      2. Students will learn diverse photographic techniques with an emphasis on how to see and create meaningful and powerful photographs they can be proud of. They will be working both out on location and in the studio.
      3. Students will learn how to see and recognize the quality of light and tone when making photographs, how to compose an image, capture a photographic moment and print traditional B&W prints in the darkroom. Students will take part in meaningful group critiques of their work. They will also learn how to give and accept constructive criticism of their and classmates’ photographs while working on assignments and a personal project.

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      Required Reading: Students will be required to regularly read one of several mainstream news outlets, such as the New York Times or the Wall Street Journal for class discussions about news and culture.
    • Photography II

      1. Course description coming soon.

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      Textbooks will be assigned in class.
    • Advanced Photography

      1. In Advanced Photography, students continue the creative exploration of this expressive medium through work with small, medium, and large format cameras, printing, and extensive use of electronic and experimental lighting. Work is done in both analog and digital photographic media. Students have input into the thematic development of the course. They are asked to combine writings with image-making and research in order to prepare a college-level portfolio.
      2. This course can be taken for one or two years. It is offered to 11th and 12th graders who have successfully completed the introductory course in photography.
      3. Course content is adjusted to the level of the class and individual students.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Advanced Photography II

      1. In Advanced Photography, students continue the creative exploration of this expressive medium through work with small, medium, and large format cameras, printing, and extensive use of electronic and experimental lighting. Work is done in both analog and digital photographic media. Students have input into the thematic development of the course. They are asked to combine writings with image-making and research in order to prepare a college-level portfolio.
      2. This course can be taken for one or two years. It is offered to 11th and 12th graders who have successfully completed the introductory course in photography.
      3. Course content is adjusted to the level of the class and individual students.

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      Click on the book(s) above for direct purchasing options. Please note: if you would like to find the books through another vendor, be sure to take note of the exact ISBN numbers so you/your child has the correct book for class.
    • Beginning Ceramics

      1. This semester course is open to all students interested in working with clay. The primary focus of the class is learning how to create pottery using the potter's wheel. Students learn to throw bowls, cylinders, and forms derived from cylinders. Students learn to trim their pots. Methods used to glaze pots are also taught. Students are introduced to the equipment in the ceramics studio and its care. Students learn some of the technical terms and their meanings.
      2. Students explore a variety of books and catalogs about ceramics, and see videos of famous potters.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      No textbook required.
    • Intermediate Ceramics

      1. These semester courses are open to all students who have completed the prerequisite ceramics course. Classes are tailored to each student, focusing on individual interests. Ceramics students are expected to increase their technical proficiency, explore a diversity of forms, and employ a variety of glazing techniques.
      2. Students learn terms and definitions in order to become more familiar with the technical aspects of ceramics. They are introduced to a number of resources in the library, and see videos of famous ceramic artists.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      No textbook required.
    • Advanced Ceramics

      1. These semester courses are open to all students who have completed the prerequisite ceramics course. Classes are tailored to each student, focusing on individual interests. Ceramics students are expected to increase their technical proficiency, explore a diversity of forms, and employ a variety of glazing techniques.
      2. Students learn terms and definitions in order to become more familiar with the technical aspects of ceramics. They are introduced to a number of resources in the library, and see videos of famous ceramic artists.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      No textbook required.
    • Art History

      In this semester-long elective course students will examine and critically analyze various methods of artistic expression from around the world. There will be a special emphasis on not only the “high” fine arts of drawing, painting, sculpture and architecture, but also of various forms of “low art” including but not limited to popular film, cartoons and other forms of artistic expression with mass appeal. The essential questions driving the course focus on understanding the historiographical significance of artistic artifacts of a culture but also examine what differentiates a piece of art from a urinal on the wall. What is art and how is it made? How does art communicate and act as a record for human experience? What can we learn about a culture through its art forms? What skills and vocabulary can help us to effectively communicate about art?

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      Textbooks will be assigned in class.
    • Digital Video Production

      1. This semester-long, project-based digital video art course focuses on the fundamentals of visual storytelling.   Students will develop an understanding of the relationship between form and content as they expand their skills in content generation, storyboarding and basic script form.  Technically, they will gain practical experience in producing, directing, lighting, shooting and editing short videos that are screened and critiqued in class. Students will work in different genres utilizing a variety of shooting techniques. Through the viewing of film clips and discussions, student's understanding and appreciation of film will be enhanced.  Students also learn to critique each other's work while developing a film vocabulary. 
      2. During the course each student will be taught:
        · How to tell a story through video
        · The basic principles of how to capture video and audio
        · How to edit video and audio

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      No textbook required.
  • OTHER COURSES

    • Human Development

      Human Development is a quarter-long course covering topics such as human sexuality,reproductive anatomy, gender roles and identity, sexual orientation, birth control, and teen pregnancy. In addition to the human sexuality component, the course discusses the dangers of drug and alcohol use. Human Development is a pass/fail course.

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      No textbook required.
    • New Student Technology Seminar

      The Student Technology Seminar is designed to both introduce the technology we use at Holderness (Learning Management System, internet, etc) as well as to discuss the broader themes of using technology in our everyday lives. The first part of this Seminar will be an orientation; assignments will familiarize you with our Portal, and you will learn easy tricks to help keep on top of your schedule. The second part of this Seminar concerns technology and its proper use. Technology is an integral part of our lives; we use it to communicate, to learn, to entertain, and to be entertained. This is true whether we are at home or at Holderness School. Technology is certainly a force for progress, but it is often a double-edged sword. Bullying, copyright infringement, hacking, stalking, and cheating have all gained new elements with the rise of smartphones, Instagram, and Snapchat. Throughout this course, we will talk about navigating these issues and becoming more aware of the difficulties they present.

      During the second section, we will look at four main topics:
      1. The Holderness Acceptable Use Policy
      2. Plagiarism and Copyright
      3. Your Cyber Footprint
      4. Digital Citizenship

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      No textbook required.
    • Senior Thesis

      Senior Thesis is an experiential educational opportunity designed to provide seniors with the platform to develop their intellectual curiosity while researching and delving into the exploration of a topic of their choosing. While the essential question they create is central, it is the educational journey the students take to address that question which is most important. Included in that experience are the following components of Senior Thesis:

      Researching and annotating
      Communicating with mentors
      Interviewing experts
      Writing a literature review
      Planning and completing a March Experience
      Presenting to the community

      Order Your Textbook(s)
      No textbook required.
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 9

    SubjectCourse
    English English 9: Humanities
    Foreign Language French 1 or French 2
    Mandarin Chinese 1 or Mandarin Chinese 2
    Spanish 1 or Spanish 2
    History Foundations of Modern Society (required semester course)
    Science Biology
    Mathematics Algebra 1
    Geometry
    Algebra 2 (for students who have successfully completed Algebra 1 and Geometry)
    Visual & Performing Arts Ninth Grade Seminar in Art (required semester course)
    Semester Course Electives

    (suggested for students who have already completed biology, or who prefer to take biology in grade 10)
    Studio Practices
    3D Design - Sculpture (completion of Studio Practices recommended)
    Beginning Ceramics
    Intermediate Ceramics (for students who have successfully completed Beginning Ceramics)
    Theater
    Band (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
    A Capella (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 10

    Students are required to take five courses each semester, plus Human Development for one quarter. Students may propose to take more or fewer classes by writing a formal proposal to the Academic Committee.
    SubjectCourse
    English English 10: Global Literatures
    Foreign Language French 2 or French 3
    Latin 3
    Mandarin Chinese 2 or Mandarin Chinese 3
    Spanish 2 or Spanish 3
    History US History 1 (semester course)
    US History 2 Seminar (semester course)
    Advanced History of the West (for qualified 10th and 11th graders)
    Science Biology
    Chemistry (for students who have successfully completed Biology)
    Honors Chemistry (for students who are very strong in math and science)
    Mathematics Geometry
    Algebra 2 (for students who have successfully completed Geometry)
    Algebra 2/Precalculus (for students who are very strong in math)
    Theology & Religious Studies World Religions (semester course)
    Human Development Human Development (required quarter course)
    Semester Course Electives in Visual & Performing Arts Studio Practices
    Advanced Studio Practices (for students who have successfully completed Studio Practices)
    2D Graphic Design
    Beginning Ceramics
    Intermediate Ceramics (for students who have successfully completed Beginning Ceramics)
    Intro to Acting
    Theater
    Music Appreciation
    Creative Movement
    Band (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
    A Capella (may be taken in addition to five academic courses)
    *Please see our AP requirements
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 11

    Students are required to take five courses each semester. Students may propose to take more or fewer classes by writing a formal proposal to the Academic Committee.
    SubjectCourse
    English English Seminars
    AP Language & Composition*
    AP Literature*
    Foreign Language French 3, French 4 or AP French Language and Culture*
    French Culture (semester course—for students who have successfully completed French 3 or French 4)
    Latin 3 or AP Latin
    Mandarin Chinese 2, Mandarin Chinese 3 or Mandarin Chinese 4
    Spanish 3, Spanish 4, AP Spanish Language or AP Spanish Literature*
    History AP US/AP European History: Advanced History of the West* (for qualified 10th and 11th graders)
    AP Comparative Government & Politics I* (semester course)
    AP Comparative Government & Politics II* (semester course)
    AP European History*
    Americans in East Asia (semester course)
    Ancient Greece (semester course)
    Ancient Rome (semester course)
    Art History (semester course)
    Early Arab-Israeli Conflict (semester course)
    Enlightenment and Romanticism (semester course)
    Irish History (semester course)
    The Modern Middle East (semester course)
    Political Media (semester course)
    Post War American Intellectual History (semester course)
    Psychology 1 (sesemester course)
    Psychology 2 (semester course)
    Women and Warfare
    Science Chemistry
    Honors Chemistry
    Physics (for students who are at the pre-calculus level or above)
    Honors Physics (for students who are at the pre-calculus level or above)
    AP Environmental Science* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Biology* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Physics C: Mechanics* (for students who have successfully completed Physics and AP Calculus)
    AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism* (for students who have successfully completed AP Physics C: Mechanics)
    Neuroscience (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Exercise Physiology (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Snow Science (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    STEM: Robotics (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Ecological Case Studies (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Mathematics Algebra 2 (for students who have successfully completed Geometry)
    Precalculus (for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    Honors Precalculus (for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2 and seek a fast-paced course in preparation for AP Calculus)
    Topic in Mathematics (for students who have successfully completed Algebra 2)
    Differential Equations (semester course)
    Calculus (for students who have successfully completed Precalculus)
    AP Calculus AB*
    AP Calculus BC*
    Computer Science (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    AP Computer Science*
    Economics (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    AP Macroeconomics* (semester course)
    AP Microeconomics* (semester course)
    AP Statistics* 
    Visual & Performing Arts All courses are available to 11th grade students
    Theology & Religious Studies Theology and Ethics (semester course)
    *Please see our AP requirements
  • SUGGESTED COURSES: GRADE 12

    Students are required to take five courses each semester. Students may propose to take more or fewer classes by writing a formal proposal to the Academic Committee.
    SubjectCourse
    English English Seminars
    AP Language & Composition*
    AP Literature*
    Foreign Language French 4 or AP French Language and Culture*
    French Culture (semester course—for students who have successfully completed French 3 or French 4)
    Latin 3 or AP Latin*
    Mandarin Chinese 3 or Mandarin Chinese 4
    Spanish 4, AP Spanish Language* or AP Spanish Literature*
    Protestas (semester course)
    History AP Comparative Government & Politics I* (semester course)
    AP Comparative Government & Politics II* (semester course—for students who have successfully completed AP Comparative Government & Politics I)
    AP European History*
    Americans in East Asia (semester course)
    Ancient Greece (semester course)
    Ancient Rome (semester course)
    Early Arab-Israeli Conflict (semester course)
    The Modern Middle East (semester course—open to qualified 11th and 12th grade students; offered on a bi-annual basis)
    Enlightenment and Romanticism (semester course—offered on a bi-annual basis)
    Irish History (semester course)
    Art History (semester course)
    Political Media (semester course—open to qualified 11th and 12th grade students; offered on a bi-annual basis)
    Post War American Intellectual History (semester course—open to qualified 11th and 12th grade students; offered on a bi-annual basis)
    Psychology 1 (semester course)
    Psychology 2 (semester course)
    Women and Warfare (semester course)
    Science Chemistry
    Honors Chemistry (recommended only for students who are very strong in math & science)
    Physics or Honors Physics (recommended for students who are at a Precalculus level of math or above)
    AP Environmental Science* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Biology* (for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    AP Physics C Mechanics* (open to qualified 11th and 12th grade students; must have successfully completed Physics and AP Calculus)
    AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism (open to students who have completed the AP Physics C: Mechanics course)
    Neuroscience (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Exercise Physiology (semester course—for students who have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Snow Science (semester course—must have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    STEM: Robotics (semester course—must have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Ecological Case Studies (
    semester course—must have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry)
    Mathematics Precalculus or Advanced Precalculus (for students who have successfully completed Algebra 2 and Geometry)
    Topic in Mathematics (must have successfully completed Algebra 2)
    Differential Equations (semester course—must have successfully completed AP Calculus AB and/or BC)
    Calculus (must have successfully completed Precalculus)
    AP Calculus AB*
    AP Calculus BC*
    AP Computer Science* (must have successfully completed Geometry and Algebra 2)
    AP Statistics*
    STEM Robotics (semester course)
    Computer Science (semester course)
    AP Macroeconomics* (semester course)
    AP Microeconomics* (semester course)
    Visual & Performing Arts All courses are available to 12th grade students
    Theology & Religious Studies Theology and Ethics (semester course)
    Senior Thesis Required year-long course
    *Please see our AP requirements


Holderness School
33 Chapel Lane, Holderness, NH 03245
mail P.O Box 1879 Plymouth, NH 03264-1879
phone (603) 536-1257